45 Original Presents Rainbow Theatre Retrospective Editions

This collection of limited edition prints celebrates the musical history of London’s iconic Rainbow Theatre 1971-1981 with re-imagined art.

Rainbow Soul by Fiftyseven for 45 Original

2021 marks the 50th anniversary of the rebirth of the iconic Rainbow Theatre in Finsbury Park, London, a venue that audiences loved as much as the incredible artists they flocked there to watch.

From 1971 to 1981 this venue crammed in gigs featuring every name that counted in music. No self-respecting act’s CV was complete without at least one date at what quickly became a venue of mythical status – the list of those having plugged in and strutted across its legendary boards is an A-Z of 70s music greats.

AC/DC, Bob Marley, David Bowie, The Clash, Fleetwood Mac, Iron Maiden, James Brown, The Jacksons, Pink Floyd, The Ramones, The Who…

Image by Ian Grundy

Astonishingly given how cherished it became, the former Finsbury Park Astoria was only at the cutting edge of live music for one short decade. The stars that burn brightest burn quickest…

45 Original is the vision of Bruce Fisher and Simon Collett, design directors and founders of Tour Design, leading creative agency in the UK live entertainment sector. 10% of Rainbow Theatre Retrospective Edition sale profits are donated to the Music Venue Trust #SaveOurVenues campaign.

Four unique designs from artist and designer Steve Mitchell of Fiftseven Design capture the Rock, Soul, Punk and Reggae music legends to have performed live at the venue in just one stellar decade before it closed its doors.


Working as a graphic designer since 1998, Steve has created and overseen advertising design for festivals such as Latitude, Reading and Leeds, Sounds Of The City Manchester, Country To Country and The Big Chill, and live campaigns for major acts including Eminem, The Black Keys, Burt Bacharach and the Spice Girls. 

As well as acting as a Senior Design Consultant for Tour Design, he can be found working on logo and identity design, producing elaborate typography for magazine covers as well as album artwork and t-shirt designs.

Steve also produces fine art, illustration and street art under the pseudonym Fiftyseven, having developed a unique style he likes to call Neo-Victorian Maximalism.

On his 45 Original collaboration he says, “As a graphic designer with a particular interest in music and typography the Rainbow Theatre brief is the most fun I’ve had for a long while. Working on these designs I was constantly thinking ‘I wish I could have seen so many of these shows!’”

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Suffolk Lines: An Interview with Rachel Sodey

Rachel Sodey is a Suffolk based artist and printmaker who responds directly to the landscape around her. Rachel walks the Suffolk countryside with her dog Bo and draws inspiration from the flat land lines, the changing light, and the mood and feelings of the seasons. We are delighted to introduce a selection of her prints, created using a variety of textural printmaking techniques. In this interview with Rachel we get a little insight into her work and find out more about her process.

How long have you been printing for? When did you start out?

My first real experience of printing was at The Norwich School of Art where I studied a degree in fine art textiles. My favourite workshop was the print room and I definitely spent most of my time in there. The technicians were absolutely amazing and taught me so much. At Norwich I mostly worked with screen printing and free-hand embroidery. It was only when I started teaching at West Suffolk College that I rediscovered my love for printing through teaching it. I have the freedom to teach all aspects of printmaking and this is what drives my own work forward.

What is it about the Suffolk landscape that inspires you?

I am definitely obsessed with the flat fields of Suffolk and the clear horizons. Even from a young age I have had favourite fields and just cannot stop photographing the perspective lines.

A lot of your prints take an unusual circular form; how did that come about?

This was by accident really. I had written a project for my students and set the parameter that they all had to produce art work within a circular form. In one particular lesson in the print room, I demonstrated to the students how to create an intaglio plate on a circular piece of drypoint cardboard. When I put it through the press I was really happy with the outcome. This 10-minute demonstration inspired a whole new series of work. Most of my prints evolve from little experiments.

Tell us about the process creating your prints and how you create your plates

I mostly work on drypoint cardboard and make marks onto the plate by using a craft knife. I also have the choice to peel away layers of the cardboard which will hold the colour of the ink (just like the engraved lines) when I print it. The shiny surface of the plate also allows me to create mono prints as well. I am able to choose how much ink to leave on or wipe of the surface, this makes the printing process very exciting as I am never quite sure how each print will turn out.

You talk about the inking process being part of the experimental nature of the printing. How does the process of printing influence the end result?

There is so much to consider when printing a plate. I use the scrim to wipe the ink off the plate once it has been pushed into the engraved lines that I have made. The scrim then also becomes a tool to add movement to my prints – it is a painterly approach really. Although I have a certain amount of control that influences the end result, there are other factors at play such as how damp the paper is and the pressure the press is set to. I am just never quite sure how effective a print will be until I peel the paper away from the inked up plate.

You mention walking, where is your favourite place to walk?

My favourite place to walk is getting lost in the fields in the village where I live in Suffolk. After about 10 minutes of walking I am able to let the dog off the lead and I am just surrounded by fields. Lately on my walks I have been seeing a heron in one certain field which is completely amazing.

Have you found lockdown influencing or changing your work in any way?

Teaching online during lockdown has definitely been challenging so this has left me with less time than normal to get out in my studio. I think lockdown has made me appreciate the ability of being able to escape in my printmaking more.

Whats your favourite takeaway (food)?

Well normally I would definitely say my favourite takeway is a good old vegi curry, but I must say that lockdown has made me crave for a big fat juicy halloumi burger with fries.

Thank you Rachel.

To view more of Rachel Sodey’s work visit her Artist’s Page on ofcabbagesandkings.co.uk.

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A Ray of Sunshine

It’s been bitterly cold on the London streets outside Of Cabbages and Kings. We have had snow, ice, and freezing winds and were chilled to the bones. So to remedy that we have brought together a collection of gift ideas to chase away the frosty weather. Think of this as a visual mug of hot chocolate. Grab a blanket, get cosy and read on.

Sunbathing by Marcelina Amelia – £250.00

We may be longing for those summer holidays so let Marcelina Amelia take you there with this screen print. She describes this print as a cure for seasonal affective disorder, and came up with the idea lying on a beach being bathed in the sun. The warmth of peachy circle in the middle inviting you to dive right in. This print will definitely see you through the winter months until summer comes back around.  

Chilli Peppers Of The World Tea Towel by Stuart Gardiner – £12.00

Why not warm up from the inside with one of nature’s hottest foods? The spicy chilli pepper! Illustrated with an array of facts about popular chillies from around the world the towel includes a taste guide, Scoville heat unit, and ripening colour. Since Columbus brought chilli peppers back to Europe five hundred odd years ago, we’ve been obsessed with these flavourful pods of heat; it’s no surprise that they’re one of the most influential spices in world cuisine.

Fire In The Belly by Tom Berry – £45.00

Is that too many chillis in the belly or the fire of life burning inside this character? With striking painterly detail, Tom Berry has built up a combination of blues, yellows and oranges to represent the fire of one’s life force burning strongly within us warm blooded humans. An inspirational print to encourage ambition.

Mini Orange Necklace by Wolf and Moon – £28.00

You can’t get sunnier than an orange! This Mini Orange Necklace sings of the essence of a Mediterranean summer. The bright little fruit is made with recycled orange and gold mirror acrylic leaves, and hang on a silky gold plated snake chain.

Moroccan Haze by Caitlin Parks – £90.00

Sunny Morocco is depicted in this warming screen print by Caitlin Parks. The hazy desert heat and light of a rocky landscape is offset by arched shapes of buildings and the outlines of palms, while overlapping layers of orange and yellow bring the sunshine inside.

Botanical Peaches by Melissa Donne – £20.00

Nothing beats a juicy peach on a hot day! These summer fruits have been depicted in warming pinks and oranges in this risograph by Melissa Donne. Inspired by traditional botanical illustration, Melissa first sketches and then develops her prints digitally before printing.

Venus Ring  by Roderick Vere – £125.00

Did you know that Venus is the hottest planet in our solar system? Roderick Vere’s Planetary Collection takes its inspiration from the planets. This Venus Ring is crafted by hand and finished with a satin sheen. A 22ct gold plating covers the dome and completes this striking fully hallmarked piece of jewellery.

Sunrise by Gavin Dobson – £140.00

A hot sun rises in this evocative screen print by Gavin Dobson. The magical scene uses the classic printing colours of cyan, yellow, magenta and black to expresses the beauty of sunrise in an abstracted landscape.

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The Art of Love – Inspiring Prints for Valentine’s Day

They say a picture speaks a thousands words, so why not let that picture speak a thousand words of love? With this post we bring together some of the most heart warming prints at Of Cabbages and Kings.

Love Is Finding Home In Another by Anastasia Beltyukova – £50.00

Two lovers embrace with a kiss – ‘Home’ is with someone you love. This couldn’t be better represented than in Anastasia Beltyukova’s risograph print Love Is Finding Home In Another. The print is from a series titled ‘I Am Home’ and was created for an exhibition exploring the theme of home and identity and the parallels between them.

Artist: Anastasia Beltyukova
Medium: Risograph print
Size: 340mm x 460mm
Edition: Signed limited edition of 25

A Year And A Day by Freya Cumming – £280.00

“O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love, What a beautiful Pussy you are, You are, You are! What a beautiful Pussy you are!”

Sail away with your loved one. This hand printed, limited edition silkscreen print by Freya Cumming, A Year And A Day, takes its inspiration from the famous Edward Lear poem, The Owl and the Pussycat. This nonsense poem starring an unlikely coupling and their romantic adventure, it is often recited at weddings. Freya has hand finished this print with gold and silver leaf to add an extra layer of magic.

To read more about artist Freya Cumming see our Q&A on the OC&K Blog.

Artist: Freya Cumming
Medium: Screen print with gold and silver leaf
Size: 460mm x 460mm
Edition: Signed limited edition of 34

Poles Apart But Very Much In Love by Sarah Beaton – £60.00

Distance is no barrier to love. You may be far away, but your kindred spirit is always close. Poles Apart But Very Much In Love is a limited edition giclée print taken from one of Sarah Beaton’s original watercolours. Inspired by her childhood in Scotland: scaling mountains, exploring forests and living by the sea, Sarah’s abstract brush strokes create a landscape, evoking a sense of place in which she adds a solitary figures to create a narrative. 

Artist: Sarah Beaton
Medium: Giclée print
Size: 406mm x 305mm (12″ x 16″) including mount
Edition: Signed limited edition of 50

Guardians Of The Heart by Johnathan Reiner – £75.00

Two figures guard the heart and keep the flames of passion burning. Guardians Of The Heart is a bold two colour screen print by Johnathan Reiner. A strong and poetic design in red and blue. As long as the guardians remain the life force burns inside them.

Artist: Johnathan Reiner
Medium: 2 colour hand pulled screen print
Size: 297mm x 420mm (A3)
Edition: Signed limited edition of 100

Singing In The Rain by Factory Press – £85.00

Liz Loveless of Factory Press creates beautifully illustrative and expressive prints in a variety of mediums. Two tap dancing shoes are surrounded by a whole host of collaged elements. Umbrellas, raindrops, lamp posts and even musical notes fly around them, bringing to mind the famous Gene Kelley film Singing In The Rain.

To read about our tour of Factory Press visit the OC&K Blog.

Artist: Liz Loveless / Factory Press
Medium: Screen print and collage
Size: 500mm x 700mm

Pink Matter by Marcelina Amelia – £250.00

Two bodies lie as if they are sunbathing with arms around each other and a snake draped over their shoulders. This striking screen print by Marcelina combines her distinctive drawing style with the intensity of bright neon colours. Their backs to us the figures display peachy bums. Knickers or tan lines? Their pink skin hotly glows.

For an insight into Marcelina Amelia’s process see our interview with her on the OC&K Blog.

Artist: Marcelina Amelia
Medium: Screen print with copper foil
Size: 500mm x 700mm
Edition: Signed limited edition of 35

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Birds of a Feather

The 29th – 31st of January is the RSPB’s Big Garden Birdwatch. This annual event which began in 1979 is claimed by the RSPB to be the ‘world’s biggest wildlife survey’. During these three days the RSPB are encouraging us all to look out of our windows and record the birds we see. This valuable birdwatching data is used to record the population of different bird species in order to track their numbers, and aid in the preservation of some of our most loved garden visitors.

Birds are inspiration for many artists and makers. Here we take a look at some of our feathered friends found nesting on the shelves and in the print racks at Of Cabbages and Kings. And you might just learn a few fascinating facts along the way!

British Birds by Caitlin Parks – £35.00

Caitlin Parks takes a look at some of the more characterful small birds in this graphic black and white screen print reminiscent of traditional woodcut illustration.

  • The Blackbird (top right) adult male has sleek jet black plumage which is instantly recognisable. Usually nesting in bushes or hedgerows, they feed on insects and earthworms pulled from the ground.
  • The Bullfinch (bottom right) is a secretive bird who hides amongst dense branches. With a short beak it feeds on seeds and buds of fruit trees. It will also feed from seed feeders and suet balls hung in gardens.

Gold Top by Anna Marrow – £80.00

A vibrant screen print by Anna Marrow featuring a glitter covered gold topped bottle of milk. Showing a more mischievous side to this little garden bird.

  • The Blue Tit is a small familiar friend in the garden. Feeding on aphids, beetles and caterpillars, it is one of the most agile and acrobatic birds and well suited to hanging upside down from feeders. It nests in boxes or holes in trees.

The Owl And The Butterfly by Lauren Mortimer – £95.00

This ornate owl giclée print by Lauren Mortimer is taken from one of her highly detailed graphite drawings. The bird’s wings camouflage a mass of butterflies or perhaps moths flocking to the moon.

  • The Barn Owl with its iconic heart-shaped face is mainly nocturnal and many will only ever see a fleeting glimpse. Probably more familiar are its blood-curdling night time screeches. Feeding on rodents it hunts over open countryside.

Common Kingfisher by Melissa North – £50.00

This bright and colourful screen print by Melissa North depicts the elusive Common Kingfisher, waiting amongst the reeds to make his move.

  • The Kingfisher, with is famous bright orange and blue plumage, can be seen darting alongside waterways, eating fresh water fish, and nesting in tunnels dug into the river bank.

Chaffinch by Freya Cumming – £60.00

This pretty screen print by Freya Cumming in pastel shades shows a proud Chaffinch sat on a blossom filled spring branch.

  • The Chaffinch is the UK’s most common finch, with a pink breast and white wing bars. It feeds on seeds and insects and is more likely to be seen on the ground scratching for fallen seeds rather than from hanging feeders themselves.

Crow of Winter: White by 57 Design – £80.00

Steve Mitchell of FiftySeven Design creates heavily ornate and detailed screen prints. This two colour silver and black screen print captures a crow in flight.

  • The Carrion Crow has black plumage, black beak and legs, and has a wingspan of between 84 – 100cm. They are also one of the smartest birds. With a noisy call and solitary lifestyle they are often cautious when entering gardens. The crow feeds on carrion, insects, worms and also forages for scraps.

Green Woodpecker by Chris Andrews – £60

Chris Andrews’ series of vintage inspired bird screen prints feature characterful illustrations of some much loved birds like this Green Woodpecker.

  • The Green Woodpecker is the largest of the woodpeckers found in Britain. Its favourite food are ants, which it digs up from the ground rather than pecking at trees. Vibrant green with with bright red on the top of its head, it nests in the hollows of trees.

These abstract bird shapes are inspired by Doves, the symbols of peace and love. Designed by Pivot these pieces are produced by homeless people. Pivot provide coaching, financial support and guidance to create swifter pathways out of temporary accommodation.

  • A common Dove found in the UK is the Collared Dove, named after the black band that sits at the back of their necks. Their familiar monotonous cooing can be heard in gardens and towns and they are frequent visitors to garden bird tables, picking at the seeds knocked to the ground from bird feeders by other birds.

Dove Earrings – Steel by Pivot – £17.00

Dove Pendant by Pivot – £32.00

Birdcase – Exclusive Edition by Adam Bartlett- £95.00

A mass of brightly coloured birds, perhaps Starlings chatter amongst the branches in this giclée print by Adam Bartlett. This print is taken from one of Adam Bartlett’s paintings in which he uses acrylic, emulsion, enamel and spray paint to build up multiple layers and textures.

  • Starlings are noisy little speckled birds and spend most of their time in large flocks. They are common visitors to gardens and famous for their murmurations – Acrobatic displays of large flocks, that form in autumn evenings before taking roost in the trees.

Spice Gulls by Mister Peebles – £18.00

Helen McGinley, aka Mister Peebles creates fun animal pun prints from her original watercolour illustrations. Like these Spics Gulls – A humorous depiction of the famous ‘girl power’ pop group.

  • The Herring Gull is the iconic sound of the seaside. Large noisy and over confident. Eating almost anything it won’t say no to plucking an ice cream from the hands of a distracted tourist.

Ring Necked Parakeet by Julio Guerra – £80.00

Julio Guerra creates coloured brightly coloured giclée prints of tropical birds. This Ring Necked Parakeet has found a new home in the South East of England and can be seen flying in noisy flocks.

  • Ring Necked Parakeets are the UK’s only naturalised parrot. Bright green with a red beak and a black ring around its neck which gives it its name. They visit gardens in the South East of England where they will eat seeds and berries.

Cormorant And Fish by Factory Press – £120.00

Liz Loveless of Factory Press creates beautifully illustrative and expressive prints in a variety of mediums. This impressive, large Cormorant stands proudly. Its out stretched wings made of screen printed feathers and other mark making. 

  • The Cormorant can be seen along rivers and costal areas, usually with wings outstretched, drying them in the sun. It is also an expert fisher.

We have some stylish ways you can encourage British birds into your garden.

The Birdball Seed Feeder by Green&Blue is designed to provide garden birds with a varied and reliable source of food. Made in the UK from slipcast clay, this simple and stylish design is frost resistant and offers safe, year-round feeding for birds such as tits, sparrows, finches, woodpeckers and nuthatches.

The Birdball Belle Feeder has been designed to hold both large and small fat balls, fruit and kitchen scraps, it can also be used to hold nesting material such as wool. The feeder allows small birds such as tits, sparrows, nuthatches and finches to feed while deterring larger birds.

Birdball Seed Feeder by Green & Blue – £59.95

Birdball Belle Feeder by Green & Blue – £29.00

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Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner…

London, The Big Smoke! Love it or hate it our capital inspires so many of our artists. From its architecture and people, to all its different boroughs – London is huge! This city of 9 million people has something for everyone. So with this post we have highlighted a few artists that look at different aspects of the city. These London themed prints make great gifts for those that live here and also as memories for those who have moved away.

Marc Gooderham

Marc Gooderham is fascinated by shop fronts, street corners and a forgotten London. His pastel works and paintings presented as series of limited edition prints explore the city’s streets along with its decaying and unique architecture. They capture the singular beauty to be found in those neglected and overlooked spaces.

Liam Devereux

Liam Devereux is a commercial illustrator, originally from the north of England and now based in London. He has created work for American Express, Lloyds Bank and Audi among others, whilst developing a unique style in his spare time. The Nighttime Series comprises of scenes largely around North London where he has lived for the last ten years, but has begun to spread further afield.

Mike Hall

Mike’s drawings are produced digitally using a combination of design software and a pen tablet. The designs for the maps were inspired by engraved prints from the 19th century that Mike has appropriated with a contemporary twist.

Will Clarke

Will Clarke meticulously develops intricate landscapes and views of Britain’s cities and most loved locations. Will’s work primarily focuses on location and place, which he explores through a range of mediums including printmaking, architectural drawing and design. He characteristically uses bold graphic additions of colour to add different dimensions to his illustrations.

Jane Smith

Jane Smith is a freelance artist and commercial illustrator based in Dalston, East London, working in design, advertising, editorial, publishing and charities. Often inspired by travel and cityscapes, her personal work crosses over media and disciplines, from to digital sketches and drawings, to wood engraving and linocut.

Underway Studio

Underway Studio is an illustration and printmaking collective based in Brixton, South London. Founded in 2015 by six graduates as a space to continue working and developing as young designers, the collective works collaboratively across silk-screen, lino and digital print mediums. The current members of Underway Studio are: Aiden Barefoot, Anna SchmidtCaitlin Parks, and Melissa North.

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Cyanotypes – Becoming Invisible by Liz Loveless

A cyanotype print of a coat. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

Ahead of our upcoming exhibition with Liz Loveless of Factory Press we take a look at cyanotypes. In this show Liz presents us with a selection of artwork involving the cyanotype process. But what is a cyanotype and how are they created?

Dandelion and Grass cyanotypes by Liz Loveless

A cyanotype is a photographic process involving chemicals on paper or fabric that produces cyan blue prints. It was discovered by Sir John Herschel in 1842 as a way of reproducing drawings and diagrams such as architectural blueprints. Cyanotypes are a type of contact print which means the actual image being reproduced is placed directly over the paper. This opens it up to a whole host of creative possibilities, not just reproducing drawings, but using 3D objects. Liz uses this to great effect in her cyanotype works. Everyday objects such as bikes, coats, bottles and vegetation are used to create prints with a unique one-off quality.

A bike being exposed under a UV light onto treated paper. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

To create a cyanotype a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium are combined to create a photosensitive solution that is then applied to paper. This is allowed to dry in the dark to avoid exposure until it is ready to use. To create a print you must expose this coated paper to UV light, for example sunlight. This then creates a chemical reaction in the parts that are exposed to the light then darkening them. When fully exposed the chemical coated paper is then rinsed under running water. This washes away the unexposed chemical that was in shadow leaving a blank space, surrounded by the blue that was exposed to the light.

A large palm leaf  being exposed in sunlight. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

The most simple way of creating a cyanotype print is to lay objects on to your coated paper and then expose to sunlight. You can experiment with any objects. The more solid an object and the closer it is to the paper the more crisp a result you will get. Further away or less solid an object you will begin to get fuzzier edges. This is most apparent when using natural materials like leaves and flowers. Their 3D quality creates an unpredictable silhouette that fades from crisp dark blue to pale blue blurs. After the cyanotype has had an appropriate time in the sun (this can vary depending on the strength of the sunlight) it is then rinsed under running water and left to dry.

Finished print being rinsed. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

Liz Loveless will be exhibiting more of her cyanotype prints at Of Cabbages and Kings in the show ‘Becoming Invisible‘, which runs from 6 February to 31 March 2020.

You can also book a spot on our Cyanotype Workshop – 2-4pm Saturday 14th March 2020.

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The Make Bank: Tackling Creative Poverty

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We are very excited to tell you about a new social project aimed at addressing some of the issues surrounding ‘creative poverty’ and young people’s access to art and design subjects and careers. The Make Bank has been set up by Kirsty Thomas, a former art and design teacher, and founder of creative studio Tom Pigeon. Kirsty’s research revealed that in recent years there has been a significant increase in the number of secondary pupils dropping out of creative subjects. She discovered that while some pupils were being advised that the creative industries did not offer a viable career path and that perhaps they should get a ‘proper job’, on other occasions it was because they simply didn’t have, or couldn’t afford the tools they needed to complete the course. This is where The Make Bank comes in.

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The Make Bank Founder Kirsty Thomas

By providing Art and Design Kits for disadvantaged pupils, The Make Bank can help students who want to pursue creative education. Working with schools across the country The Make Bank has created quality art and design kits devised to meet the needs of all young people aged over 13 following the National Curriculum in Scotland, England, Ireland and Wales. For pupils studying GCSE, A Level, National 5, Higher and Advanced Higher qualifications they have created five subject-specific kits, so whether it’s art, design, photography, textiles or ceramics the students have the right tools for the job! Any pupil can apply for a Make Bank Kit in partnership with their teacher and it will be sent directly to their school.

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Alongside the kits the project also works with industry professionals to share inspiring stories, creative journeys and career advice, nurturing, inspiring and encouraging creative talent in young people and helping them recognise the wealth of opportunity that exists within the creative industries. To raise money for the kits Kirsty has teamed up with some of UK’s most exciting artists, illustrators and designers on the Make Bank Print Project, some of who we know very well here at Of Cabbages and Kings. You can find these ones, The Language of Colour by Stuart Gardiner (below), in our shop too. However, if prints aren’t you’re thing and you would like to donate directly just follow this link

 

We love this project, however materials alone will not create a new and diverse generation of creatives. Young people need guidance, support, inspiration and knowledge to enable them to pursue a creative career. The Make Bank is calling on everyone within the creative industries and beyond to stand up and do something about Creative Poverty. This is our opportunity to create a thriving industry that is equal, diverse and fair.

Would you like to get involved?  Visit the The Make Bank

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An Interview with Jo Angell

Jo Angell is preparing for her upcoming show: ‘Awash’ here at Of Cabbages & Kings. Featuring new works from a recent series of prints and paintings; abstract pieces, reflecting the interplay of land meeting water. The inspiration has come from landscapes as diverse as the harbours of Iceland to a riverside Essex village. Her images break the world down into bold graphic shapes, and the melding of texture and colour often reflects the interaction between industrial materials and nature.We’ve asked her a few questions and she talks us through her inspiration and processes.

What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, digital….
All of them in combination! It really depends what I’m working on. With my digital prints I often create shapes, textures and line elements with paintbrush and pens using black ink. I then scan these into my computer and start to work in a digitally creative way, to add colour and layering. With my paintings I use acrylic paint on canvas or plywood. I’m experimenting a lot with paint at the moment, with different brush sizes, substrates and acrylic mediums.


How long have you been printing and painting for?
Following a long career as a graphic designer, I did an MA in Textile Futures at Central St Martins in 2006-2008. It was during this course that I got back into screen printing (actually for wallpaper designs) and become involved with the digital revolution for print on textiles. This progressed into creating all sorts of surface pattern products. One of these was a collection of greetings cards which Tate Modern bought for their shop. I started to think of these as graphic prints as they were popular. This got me hooked into making archival quality digital prints. I also won the opportunity to create some work in a new gallery and further experimented with a set of prints for this. I’ve always painted, but in the past few years I have more felt the desire to experiment with paint and create one off pieces. Acrylic paint has suited me as I love how quickly it dries, and how rapidly I can create layers and textures.

How do you start building up an image?
With some of my paintings I have become interested in a less structured process. This might involve sketching on the canvas and painting a first rough layer. Then I like to allow myself to be more free and respond with the colours and space in any way which takes my mood at that moment. I find this interesting as sometimes this fails, and sometimes something unexpected and fresh emerges.

Where does your inspiration come from?
Travelling and finding new places always inspires me. I take a lot of photos and having just looked at them, there’s a strong theme that I’m always drawn to remnants of bygone eras or worn remnants of industrial bits and pieces. The textures on worn metals, woods and rope. In the past few years, I have been lucky enough to spend time painting in an Essex riverside village called Wivenhoe where boat shapes, rusted chains, buoys and worn wood gives me inspiration aplenty! I’m really inspired by the post war artists who went to St Ives in Cornwall such as Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth, Patrick Heron, Peter Lanyon who sought to create abstract work about the feelings of immersion in a place rather than be representational, using different materials.

Do you find having a background in Graphic Design influences your work?
To me, design and my art are linked. It’s all about balance of form, space and colour. I heard a quote from the artist Ben Nicholson recently which really resonated ‘Abstraction should be a vision of order like good design.’

Your work has a very distinctive set off repeating forms. Do you find yourself drawn to certain shapes and colours to explore a theme?
Definitely! I think most people doodle the same thing when they doodle. Mine tend to feature curves, reflections and rotations of these shapes which could be related to my textile design and pattern making background.

What’s your favourite takeaway?
Is this a foodie question?!
If it is, I love Thai vegetarian curry from Tootoomoo!

To see more of Jo’s work check out Jo Angell’s page on the OC&K site.

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An Interview with Underway Studio

Ahead of their upcoming show: Printed Spaces: East London Edition at Of Cabbages and Kings (12 April – 5 June 2019 and kicking off with a Private View – 7pm – 9pm, 11 April 2019) we have asked them a few questions.

Underway Studio is a collective of four artists based in Brixton, London. They work collaboratively on screen printed works, with a strong graphic feel that often has an architectural theme. With ‘Printed Spaces: East London Edition’ they explore the architecture of London’s cultural spaces, featuring new prints with an East London focus.

Underway’s, Melissa North, Caitlin Parks, Anna Schmidt and Aiden Barefoot.

There are currently four members of Underway Studio, how did you meet?
We all studied on the same Illustration and Visual Communication degree, but across several years. After graduation, we set up our own studio space to continue working in screen print and it has evolved from there. Initially the studio was a space to pursue our individual practices, but we started to collaborate on a few prints and soon developed a strong collective voice. After having a few different homes across London, we are now based in Brixton where we produce our own work and teach workshops.

 

How do you work on an idea collectively?
For the past 6 months our work has predominately been focused on the architecture of London’s cultural spaces. We wanted to start this portfolio as both a celebration of the rich culture we have in this city and to showcase the architecture of these spaces, much of which has been re-purposed and developed over the years. When we start developing prints we take a lot of photos and collage these together to see which subjects have the most interesting aesthetic, passing designs between one another until they are ready to be taken into screen print.
What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, digital, print?
Screen printing and collage. We love the way that you can play with scale and overlaying different colours and textures to create a completely unique result.

 

Tell us about the production side of things and how you produce work as a collective.
We physically share the files and material of what we are working on together. Print designs are passed between the collective until they are finalised and ready to screen printed. As a result, the artworks have an impression from each member creating a unique aesthetic. 

National Theatre by Underway Studio

Where do your influences come from for your subject matter?
Much of our work is influenced by architecture, form, texture and colour. Using a physical print process means that our visual language is both playful and distinctive, embracing any happy accidents along the way.
You have a very distinctive, bold use of colour. Is the colour influenced by the subject matter or come from somewhere else?
Colour lends itself extremely well to screen print.  Overlaying layers and textures creates interesting results that inspire and drive our work. We experiment in the studio doing test prints and playing with different colour combinations and this often leads us to our final palette.

 

What are your favourite takeaways?
We are all massive foodies and will eat anything from pizza to ramen. Honest Burger in Brixton is a particular favourite of ours, but you can’t beat South London staple Morleys to get us through the long printing hours!

 

To see more work by Underway Studio take a look at our website here. If you do get a chance come by the shop and check out the show.

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