OC&K Curates – Gold Circles

On a grey January day with heavy clouds and the ever-present threat of rain in the air, we can start to long for sunnier times. In a series of blog posts titled ‘OC&K Curates’, Of Cabbages and Kings takes you on a themed tour of some of our favourite products. We have wandered the shelves and explored the print racks to put together this curated selection to chase away those dull days. The first of these posts looks at Gold Circles, pleasing circular shapes that remind us of a glint of gold and the warmth of the sun.

The straw colour of these Orla 11 Earrings takes the colour theme of gold, but with a softer more muted tone like hay bales in the evening sun. These classic link earrings are handmade by Wolf & Moon in their London studio. Made from painted wood they are lightweight enough to be worn all day. With the right amount of movement they are elegant and the colour is perfect to brighten up a dreary day or to complete a spring outfit.

Orla II Earrings in Straw by Wolf & Moon – £45.00

Taking inspiration from glamorous 80s beach parties, the gold circle in Sol Dawn by Tom Pigeon lends itself to an artistic interpretation of the rising sun. The shimmering gold foil print dramatically shines out from a pale background, like the sun emerging over the horizon on a misty morning. A minimal yet atmospheric addition to your home.

Sol Dawn by Tom Pigeon – £35

Two gold plated rings shine here and join together with cleverly design details in this Gold Rings Necklace by Brass & Bold. Hanging at either end of a chain they are secured as the chain passes through one of the hoops. A stylish piece perfect for day and evening wear. Each piece of Brass & Bold jewellery is handmade and designed by Elsa Gomez in London with an emphasis on exploring the simplicity and honesty of materials.

Gold Rings Necklace by Brass & Bold – £22

Ectopia is a print by the Brixton collective Underway Studio. Caitlin Parks and Melissa North both of Underway collaborated on this print which formed part of an art installation. Circles radiate around different animals and plants referencing the interconnection of all life.

The original project consisted of a multi-sensory installation exploring the appeal of Utopian thinking. It envisages a sustainable and better future for our planet and Society. The installation was featured in The London Design Festival 2016 and went on to showcase in the Porto and Belgium Design Biennale.

The illustration takes inspiration from a quote by Jason Hickel, ‘If we are to chart our way into a sustainable future, we will need to abandon our ontology of individualism and relearn this ontology of connection. We will need to rediscover the basic truth that our existence as individuals is bound up with the existence of others, and that our fate as a species is bound up with that of the fish, the forests, the bees, and the oceans.’

To read our interview with Underway Studio see the OC&K blog post.

Ectopia by Underway Studio – £60

These Form Circle Earrings in Yellow by Tom Pigeon mirror brass and coloured Formica. Inspired by mid-century modernist art and handcrafted using layers of yellow Formica and solid brass, this simple asymmetrical pair celebrate the circle. Tom Pigeon work closely with a family-run etching workshop on the West coast of Scotland to produce the bespoke metal pieces for their jewellery, which Tom Pigeon then polishes and assembles by hand in their studio.

Form Circle Earrings in Yellow by Tom Pigeon – £30

Circles are dominant in this Reykjavík 2 print by Jo Angell. The Reykjavík series are a collection of prints inspired by the artist’s trip to Iceland and in particular its harbours and the sea. This print reflects abstracted shapes reminiscent of life buoys or port holes on a ship, set against a warm palette of sand and gold. The original images were made using bold brush strokes and pen and ink drawings mixed with rough textures in contrasting dark and light colours.

To read more about Jo Angell see our interview with her on the OC&K blog post.

Reykjavík 2 by Jo Angell – £90

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Beat The Blues

There are many things here at Of Cabbages & Kings to fill your whole year with new discoveries, experiences and learning. What better time to find a new obsession! Here we present a collection of our best new year ideas, from learning a craft or getting out and about, to decorating your home interiors.

Learn To Screen Print

Ever thought about trying screen printing or wondered how it was done? Then look no further then these Screen Printing Kits. Great for creating your own t-shirts, tote bags or prints, they come in two sizes A4 and A3 and are perfect for starting a screen printing adventure at home. For a how-to-guide follow our simple instructions: How to Screen Print with Stencils.  They include: a 43T mesh count wooden screen, a wooden square 75 shore squeegee and 100ml white and black water based screen printing ink for printing fabric, paper or card.

Want to take your screen printing to the next level? Try this Screen Printing – The Ultimate Studio Guide from the team at Print Club London. Expert tips for for printers of all levels of experience and ability.

A4 Screen Printing Kit – £36

A3 Screen Printing Kit – £48

Screen Printing – The Ultimate Studio Guide – £24.95

Take A Workshop

Workshops are a great way of gaining an amazing experience and learning directly from talented teachers. Of Cabbages & Kings along side our sister shop Knit With Attitude offers a wide range of workshops ideal for learning a new skill in 2020.

Roderick Vere is a silversmith based in Somerset who, with his keen eye for detail and creativity, designs and hand makes contemporary silver jewellery. He also offers Silver Ring Making Workshops here in Stoke Newington. In a 2 hour workshop you will be taught how to cut, shape and finish your own silver ring. The workshop is the perfect introduction for anyone keen to try jewellery making using traditional silversmithing techniques. At the end of the session you will have a completely unique piece of silver jewellery made entirely by you!

If you are looking for something a little different, Knit With Attitude offer various yarn based craft workshops. Like Learning to Knit or Beginners guide to Crochet.

Make a Silver Ring workshop with Roderick Vere at Of Cabbages & Kings – £50

Workshops at Knit With Attitude

Learn Some Local History

We stock a wide range of books that take a creative and insightful view of our surroundings. Being based in East London we are especially interested in books with an East London focus and local history or art projects in the neighbourhood give us the most inspiration. Collector’s books like the East End in Colour series by independent publishers Hoxton Mini Press provide a photographic snapshot into how the East End looked between the 60s – 80s and 80s – 90s, while Once Upon a Time in Brick Lane looks at the documentary photography of Paul Trevor, capturing the life of Brick Lane during the 70s and 80s,

The Gentle Author in East End Vernacular presents a magnificent selection of pictures – many never published before – revealing the evolution of painting in the East End and tracing the changing character of the streets through the twentieth century.

The East End In Colour 1960-1980 by David Granick – £16.95

The East End In Colour 1980-1990 by Tim Brown – £16.95

Once Upon a Time in Brick Lane by Paul Trevor  – £25

East End Vernacular – £25

Keep A Diary

While dates are important, keeping a diary in 2020 doesn’t all need to be about birthdays, and dental appointments, it can also be used as a journal for day-to-day memories, dreams, ideas and inspirations. These Layflat Weekly Planners by Ola come in two colours: Navy Shapes and Orange. They are designed with undated pages so you can start at any time year, making them great for both the calendar or academic year. Featuring 52 undated weekly spreads, each minimally styled with columns for to-do lists, room for evening plans as well as free space for notes.

Layflat Weekly Planner – Navy Shapes – £18

Layflat Weekly Planner – Orange – £18

Go On A Walk

Getting out and about is even more fun with a sense of purpose and destination. Try these themed London Maps and go on a voyage of discovery. With an architectural look at the capital, one side is printed with the map and the reverse contains facts and images of each of the buildings featured. Subjects include Brutalism, Art Deco and even the London Underground.

Brutalist London Map – £8

London Underground Architecture & Design Map – £9

Art Deco London Map – £8

Get Crafty

Crafting is a great way to challenge yourself this new year. From the most simple to the more complex, craft provides a mindful way to while away the hours.

We stock Design Stencils that allow you to recreate the iconic shapes and typographic styles of the Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Bauhaus movements. They’re ideal for all sorts of craft projects, such as card making, scrapbooking or just illustrating your favourite notebooks.

If you’ve wanted to take up drawing, or just like to doodle in style then choose one of Ola’s Layflat Notebooks and a Set of Colourblock Pencils. Using Ola’s stylish patterns these soft cover notebooks are crafted with a sewn layflat binding, allowing you to work across two pages simultaneously, and the book to rest open at a chosen page. Ola’s Colourblock Pencils are cleverly colour coded between different grades and we have them in 3H, HB and 3B. For more information on pencils check out our Pencil Guide blog post.

Art Nouveau Design Stencil – £12.50

Bauhaus Design Stencil – £12.50

A5 Ruled Layflat Notebook – Kaffe Print, Brick Red – £11.95

Set of 3 Colourblock Pencils – HB – £6.00

Grow Something 

The year has just started but there’s no reason not to start dreaming of warmer months, getting out into the garden and what to grow this year. Even if you don’t have a garden houseplants can always do with a bit of TLC. Two things to set this dream in motion are Seed Collecting Kits and House Plant Care Cards.

Seed Collecting Kits are designed for organising and storing your seeds. This handy tin contains 20 wooden seed labels, 20 seed envelopes, a mini plant dibber and pencil. Time to tidy up the shed!

Take proper care of your plants with House Plant Care Cards. Always failing to keep things alive? Well with this ultimate guide to growing happy plants you can’t fail. The Houseplant Care Cards are a boxed gift set containing 35 cards packed full of advice and tips for botanical success indoors.

Seed Collecting Kits – £14.50

House Plant Care Cards – £12.95

Have Some Big Ideas

Jump-start your brain in the new year with the Thames & Hudson The Big Idea Series of books. This innovative and informative series take a look at the fundamental ideas that impact our lives and world today. Cleverly designed to make the reading approachable and engaging. The series features: Is Masculinity Toxic?, Is Gender Fluid?, Is Democracy Failing?, Will AI Replace Us?, Is Capitalism Working?, Should We All Be Vegan?, What Shape is Space? and Is Medicine Still Good For Us?

The Big Idea Books – £12.95 (each)

Make Some Scented Candles

Are you a fan of scented candles? Ever wondered how you can make some yourself? Make Your Own Candle Kits of course! A great way of chasing away the January blues, not only rewarding in their making, but also in their use. These kits make two 9cl Votives so you can make one for yourself and one for a friend. Scents come in Rose Geranium, Fresh Fig and Christmas Spice.

Each kit contains everything you need to create two scented candles: Soy wax flakes, fragrance oil, glass jars and wicks. The simple instruction leaflet explains exactly how to make your candles with ease, making this a thoughtful gift for any creative person.

Make Your Own Candle Kits – £18 (each)

Take Care of Nature

Looking after nature is a rewarding past time. Every little way we can encourage wildlife is a positive one and there are many ways in which we can do this, like giving homes to solitary bees or providing food for small birds in winter.

You can encourage solitary bees into your garden by using bee hotels like this Bee Brick by Green&Blue, available in Charcoal and White. Solitary bees don’t produce honey or live in hives, but they are responsible for a third of all the food we eat, because of the vital pollination they carry out. Bee Bricks are inspired by the natural way bees reproduce and so contain cavities in which solitary bees can create their nests. One female solitary bee will potentially use around 5-6 cavities, laying 5-7 eggs in each one.

To feed the birds try these stylish Birdball Belle Feeder’s by Green&Blue, designed to take suet fat balls. Made in the UK this feeder allows small birds such as tits, sparrows, nuthatches and finches to feed while deterring larger birds and available in four different colours.

Bee Brick – £27

Birdball Belle Feeder – £26 (each)

Learn Some Art Theory

Want to learn more Art Theory this year? Then this series of Art Essentials Books by Thames & Hudson is for you. Focusing on key artistic movements and ideas, these clearly written books are more than just informative, they also beautifully designed with full colour imagery throughout. They will certainly make your book shelf look smarter! A must for reading before the next pub quiz, or for brushing up on your Mastermind specialist subject. The series includes: Surrealism, Modern Art, Women Artists, Pop Art, Key Moments In Art, Street Art, Looking At Pictures and Impressionism.

Art Essentials Books – £10.95 (each)

Decorate Your Home

The new year is a great time to address that troublesome bare wall in your home or get that print you’ve had lying around framed up. If you’re looking for the perfect artwork for your interior then shop for Prints online or come visit us in our Stoke Newington store. With an ever changing series of exhibitions and events you are guaranteed to find something that catches your eye.  Check out our Shows Page for current exhibitions.

Don’t forget we also offer a framing service and can supply standard and custom sized frames for those tricky sizes. Contact us for more information and quotes.

Happy New Year!

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Introducing Studio Nilli

Studio Nilli is the brainchild of industrial designer Huw Williams. Based in North London he produces 3D printed plant pots from bioplastic, an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional plastics.

Huw Williams creator of Studio Nilli

These little pots are stylishly designed and celebrate the ribbed texture created by 3D printing. With a nod to Scandinavian design, they are minimal, light and elegant. We stock three colours of the Studio Nilli pots, White, Dark Grey and Teal.  With five different sizes to choose from, there is sure to be one to fit any corner of your home.

The Medium Geometric Planter and the Tag Legged Planter

We have asked him a few questions about his process and inspiration as well as looking at the pots in closer detail.

Huw William’s 3D printer in action, producing a Studio Nilli pot

How did you get into 3D printing?
I’ve always been interested in 3D printing a tool for designers to prototype and test their concepts, but I didnt get the chance to experiment much with one whilst I studied Industrial Design and Technology at Brunel Uni. I bought a cheap kit printer from China to learn more about it back in 2016, and through testing the boundaries of my machine and experimenting with different printing techniques I started printing pots for my plant collection (which was fairly out of control back then).

How does your design process start? Through drawing or digital?
The design process is pretty fluid for me, but I do like to start with sketching as the main medium. I have several sketch books, but mostly I draw with whatever is available when something triggers an idea. Once I have an idea sketched out, I’ll make a card model or jump onto the computer and start drawing on Illustrator, or onto a 3D design package.

What inspires the shape of your designs?
The original origami pot shape I started Nilli with was a natural progression from some origami textures I modelled for a project at Uni. After graduating I experimented with casting cement into single use card moulds, even did some slip-casting moulds for ceramic pots, before deciding it would be a great form for the pots I 3D print now. The leggy pots come from a love of mid-century modern design and Scandinavian influences. I think the main thing that excites and influences me is how to use the materials and process of 3D printing in a unique and novel way, contrasting with other materials and textures, using the process to produce forms that would not be possible with other forms of manufacture.

Tell us about the bioplastic you use?
So the plastic I use is a common 3D printing material – PLA or Polylactic Acid. It is a bioplastic, which means that it is produced from organic materials like sugarcane or cornstarch. This is fermented to produce lactic acid (the same stuff that gives us cramp after too much rigorous exercise), which is then polymerised – lots of lactic acids chained together – to make polylactic acid. The main benefits of using this plastic is that it is a renewable source of material, does not use petrochemical fuels as a base so is non-toxic, so when printing it doesn’t release any harmful gases – it actually smells like sugar when printing. It will also biodegrade faster than normal plastics, over around 500 years it will break down naturally, or it can be industrially composted and it will return back to its base organic compounds in a few days. I also recycle waste that I produce into jewellery, coasters and hopefully larger items soon. It’s a minimal amount, because 3D printing is an additive process and there is not much waste involved, but I think its important to use as much as possible!

Lets take a closer look at the pots:

The Large Geometric Planter

The Small, Medium and Large Geometric Planter’s have a strong graphic shape, almost origami like. These pots sit flat on a surface, with a cork base to stop scratches. They are not only plant pots, perfect for those succulents and cacti! Use them for anything from storing pens and pencils on your desk, to a tidy for make up brushes or accessories.

The Short White Legged Planter and the Tall Dark Grey Legged Planter

The Tall and Short Legged Panters are the curvaceous cousins of the Geometric Pots. Clean and modern shaping, with a distinctly mid-century modern feel.  These pots sit proudly on two sizes of beeswax finished wooden legs. The plump curves, satisfyingly hugging the legs, create a pleasing synergy between the two materials. The White Planters have beech legs and the Dark Grey have walnut, giving a complimentary natural feel.

Find more Studio Nilli planters at ofcabbagesandkings.co.uk

Shop for more Studio Nilli Planters online at ofcabbagesandkings.co.uk

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Georgia Bosson Studio Visit by George Cullen

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Georgia Bosson, a screen printer and textile artist based in South London shows me around her studio and talks about her inspiration and practice.  Her screen printed trays and patterned notebooks, as well as collaborative prints with Cecily Vessey are now available in Of Cabbages and Kings.

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Ideas and experiments are pinned up behind her desk.

How long has the Georgia Bosson Studio been running?

I started the studio in 2013 after being offered a place to trade at Crafty Fox Market with my first batch of products, mostly cushions and a rainbow of hand screen printed tea towels. Since then I have taken on a huge variety of projects from developing my own line of products, to designing an outdoor canopy for a gallery and everything else in between! I am currently working on some new ideas after a trip to Mexico last October and I have just a launched a website for Makers House, a show that I curate and which I have big plans for in the coming months!

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Georgia’s process starts with sketchbook drawings that are then converted into vector graphics and applied to film.

How did you become interested in pattern and screen printing?

I first screen printed whilst studying for my A-levels and always returned to it as a means of laying down colour and texture over a large surface before adding more intricate details during my Embroidery degree. I love the immediacy of the process and I really enjoy that there is a certain level of restriction within the design process especially when I am working through ideas with paper stencils.

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A stencil is applied to the screen and then the ink is pushed though.

You seem to be keen on the hands on process of making, how does that affect your practice?

More often than not I design through making, I’ll usually have a series of drawings in my sketchbook that I then convert into hand cut paper stencils to be screen printed. I then continue to develop these ideas often bouncing around between a variety of imagery and generating lots of samples before settling on a few key ideas that are really working. This allows me to be less constrained and enables happy accidents such as inadvertently overlapped colours to occur, which often end up in final designs! My screen printed work always feels like it has more energy than the digital work and I love the idea that almost everything I make is unique in some way.

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A screen printed tray base.

We have recently started stocking your trays and notebooks, where did the inspiration come from for the design and patterns on those?

The notebooks were inspired by the remnants from industrially die cut felt that I have been working with since starting my business. It is a weird and wonderful material that is the waste product from when felt washers are cut out, the aim was to capture the shapes created when the patterns are overlaid. All of the books were riso printed and bound in London and are a limited edition of fifty. The tray pattern designs came from a series of drawings exploring the textures and patterns on a typical British beach, and the trays themselves were inspired by the sea defences in the sea side town where I have spent every summer since I was one!

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Georgia mixes her own colours at the studio and applies them to fabric. This way she can adjust and tweak the shades for her desired look.

You have an interesting colour palette that runs through your work, are there certain colours you are drawn to?

I love colour in any form, one of the best bits about screen printing is taking the time to mix colours, I have hundreds of scraps of fabric that are covered in colour swatches from past projects – they are one of the best archives of my process and I can never bear to throw them away. At the moment I am working on a new colour pallet based on a trip to Mexico, so currently there are lots of pinks and oranges on the print table spiked with soft teals and greens.

I am always drawn to an acid/mustard yellow and you can’t go wrong with a beautiful slate grey. When settling on the colours for a design I always think about the use of the final object and where it sits in the home, I felt I was able to be much bolder with my trays as they won’t necessarily be on display at all times and will usually have something on them!

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Greenwich- From The Wolfe Statue by Georgia Bosson and Cecily Vessey

We also stock your collaborative prints the ‘Landmark Locations’ series, a collaboration with Cecily Vessey. How did the idea for these come about?

Cecily was my mentor for my first market and since meeting we have worked on various pop up events and projects together including a live collaborative mural of the View from Peckham, which was done over a weekend at Crafty Fox Market. After the success of the Peckham mural and print we decided to look at expanding our collaboration and ended up working on twelve prints that we funded on Kickstarter. Whilst there are no plans for any more collaborative prints we are currently working towards a 100 mile bike ride together so I am sure some fresh ideas will crop up during the many training hours!

Your trays will be perfect for for serving drinks at summer parties! Whats your favourite cocktail?

In the summer an Aperol Spritz – very specifically served in a big glass preferably somewhere hot and sunny. And in the winter you can’t beat an Old Fashioned!

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By The Power Of Voodoo

I’m heading down to Glastonbury this weekend for Halloween. This autumn festival always used to be quite a big deal when I was growing up in Suffolk and I have fond and funny memories of nights out at Oaksmere and Thornham Magna, seeing John Cooper Clarke, being shouted at by one-toothed angry farmers screaming ‘Get off my land!’, and eagerly anticipating whether the witch on the zip wire would make her full flight. She never did!

It’s the first time in a while that I’ve had the chance to celebrate Halloween properly and I think I may have got a little carried away. My brother has just moved to the West Country to take on La Terre, a bar and cafe in Glastonbury town. This is their first big event, there’s a delta swamp blues band and the theme is Louisiana Voodoo.

So, maybe not your average housewarming gift, but here goes Voodoo! I’m going to make myself a custome and something for them to hang on the wall – Voodoo-style.

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Flora and Fauna

Wow! It’s amazing (and a little frightening) what you can get on the internet these days. I purchased myself a whole sheep skull. A tad grim, but after a couple of days in a bucket of bleach I felt comfortable it was truly dead, and a delicate little rabbit skull. I did also spot a taxidermy crocodile head going for a tenner! Then I took a walk around the park, gathered some sticks, fished some feathers out the duck pond and had a look through granny’s old embroidery stash. And a ha! I knew there was a reason I kept those horrid beads that looked a  bit like bones for over 20 years!

We’ve had a couple of exhibitions at the shop recently that definitely influenced my choice of colours. Both Martha Copeland and Johnathan Reiner‘s female portraits exploring ceremonious dress and tribal skin markings tackle notions of beauty, worship and costume. I revisited those, sat down to a large dosage of True Detective and then set to task.

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Totem 1 – Artemis

 

 

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Totem 2 – Rhea

 

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Martha Copeland

So after quite a lot of twisting, winding, braiding, weaving etc this was the result. The final touch being some of granny’s gold buttons that I attached to the sheep’s eye sockets. She’s currently in the shop window scaring away our potential customers! (The sheep skull – not my granny)

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Sheep skull Voodoo wall decoration

 

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Close Up

 

I thought the sheep’s skull might be a bit awkward to wear as a headdress so I decided to make something a little smaller out of the rabbit skull. My brothers always used to mock me for my ‘Jennifer Connelly in Labyrinth’ teenage tantrums. I’ve just got a bit closer to playing the part.

Happy Halloween!

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Rabbit skull head dress

The Photo Finish

And here are the final images! Just in case any of you were wondering, this is what the bricks and mortar shop looks like. Get ready for a guided tour!

Contemporary fine art prints
Contemporary fine art prints
Gifts, jewellery, stationery, homewares
Gifts, jewellery, stationery, homewares
The shop floor
The shop floor

We share our space at Of Cabbages & Kings with Knit with attitude, specialists in eco-friendly and fairtrade yarn, hence all the beautiful brightly coloured wool to the right.

Workshop area
Workshop area

This is our workshop area to the back or the shop. We hold all sorts of beginner and intermediate classes. Check out the website for details: Workshops

Yarn bombed, granny square, crochet counter
Yarn bombed, granny square, crochet counter

This is another photo of the crocheted granny square counter that Maya and I spent so many hours constructing. Our ‘floating box’.

Counter Action

It’s been a long time coming, but today we finally finished the counter. Hurray!!! A contemporary take on the good old granny square. We were aiming for a floating box effect and I think that’s what we’ve achieved. The colours are rather stone-like, however it’s incredibly soft to touch as it’s constructed from Ushya, which is a chunky merino wool. Also, as the wool is only temporarily fixed, we’re free to change the look as we wish.

A big thanks to both Knit with attitude and Finch Munro for both the design and build/crochet of the project.

 

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Licence to Grill

It’s that time of year when baking fever takes over the country.  A new series of the Great British Bake Off began this week and we’ve got two new oven glove designs to jazz up your kitchen and aid you in your quest to create the perfect Victoria Sponge!

 

‘Rock Cake’ Double Oven Glove

Baking is the new rock ‘n’ roll (apparently), so we’ve come up with the ultimate rockin’ oven glove; a recipe of classic bands combined with dodgy baking puns, all in tattoo form.
Think ‘Bread Zeppelin’, ‘Rolling Scones’, ‘Tofu Fighters’, and 17 more ‘hilarious’ band puns, all inked onto a double oven glove. The perfect piece of kit for your next jam (making) session.

 

Rock Cake Double Oven Glove

 

‘Licence To Grill’ Single Oven Mitt
Yes, yes, y’all! Unleash yo inner gangster rapper whilst grillin’ with this bling inspired mitt. Complete with knuckle dusters and diamond encrusted watch prints. Word.
3 colour double sided print, with metallic gold detailing.

 

Licence to Grill Oven Mitts