Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner…

London, The Big Smoke! Love it or hate it our capital inspires so many of our artists. From its architecture and people, to all its different boroughs – London is huge! This city of 9 million people has something for everyone. So with this post we have highlighted a few artists that look at different aspects of the city. These London themed prints make great gifts for those that live here and also as memories for those who have moved away.

Marc Gooderham

Marc Gooderham is fascinated by shop fronts, street corners and a forgotten London. His pastel works and paintings presented as series of limited edition prints explore the city’s streets along with its decaying and unique architecture. They capture the singular beauty to be found in those neglected and overlooked spaces.

Liam Devereux

Liam Devereux is a commercial illustrator, originally from the north of England and now based in London. He has created work for American Express, Lloyds Bank and Audi among others, whilst developing a unique style in his spare time. The Nighttime Series comprises of scenes largely around North London where he has lived for the last ten years, but has begun to spread further afield.

Mike Hall

Mike’s drawings are produced digitally using a combination of design software and a pen tablet. The designs for the maps were inspired by engraved prints from the 19th century that Mike has appropriated with a contemporary twist.

Will Clarke

Will Clarke meticulously develops intricate landscapes and views of Britain’s cities and most loved locations. Will’s work primarily focuses on location and place, which he explores through a range of mediums including printmaking, architectural drawing and design. He characteristically uses bold graphic additions of colour to add different dimensions to his illustrations.

Jane Smith

Jane Smith is a freelance artist and commercial illustrator based in Dalston, East London, working in design, advertising, editorial, publishing and charities. Often inspired by travel and cityscapes, her personal work crosses over media and disciplines, from to digital sketches and drawings, to wood engraving and linocut.

Underway Studio

Underway Studio is an illustration and printmaking collective based in Brixton, South London. Founded in 2015 by six graduates as a space to continue working and developing as young designers, the collective works collaboratively across silk-screen, lino and digital print mediums. The current members of Underway Studio are: Aiden Barefoot, Anna SchmidtCaitlin Parks, and Melissa North.

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Follow Your Nose!

This post is dedicated to all things olfactory at Of Cabbages and Kings. While we stock a range of aromatic home fragrances to keep your house smelling beautiful, also included in this post are some not so smelly, but equally as nosey gift ideas. Follow your nose though this curated selection of gift ideas.

Hobo + Co candles are hand poured in small batches in Lincolnshire, England. They are made from soy wax which is a healthier alternative to traditional to paraffin wax candles. Cleaner burning with no toxins or carcinogens, soy gives off less soot and burns at a cooler temperature, so the candles last longer. Each candle has approximately 35 hours burn-time and available in four different fragrances.

Featured in Elle: Decoding Clean Candles – The Scented Alternative That Won’t Damage Your Health 13/08/2019

Karina Bank’s Anatomy Collection, designed for empowered women, is inspired by the unique and beautiful irregularities of the female form. Each piece is handcrafted sustainably in Karina’s Tottenham based studio from sterling silver.

These abstracted nose-shaped earrings are made from 2mm sterling silver round wire, offering an alternative to traditional hoop earrings. A humorous design that is minimal and stylish. Their irregular handmade design means each one is very slightly different. 

Hobo + Co’s collection of room mists are a great way for helping cleanse and refresh your home. Naturally scented with a blend of pure essential oils they are vegan and paraben free. Available in three different fragrances and blended from pure essential oils in a 100ml recyclable amber glass bottle.

These comedy glasses attached to a classic fake nose. It may not be very good for smelling, but this image will certainly put a smile on your face. Look further and you will see Lauren Mortimer has hidden three cats in the bushy eyebrows and moustache of this peculiar disguise.

Taken from one of Lauren’s original graphite drawings and printed on Hahnemuehle German Etching (matt textured) 310gsm paper.

Read our Interview Lauren Mortimer.

These reed diffusers fill your room with long-lasting fragrance without the need to burn or light a candle, so they are perfect anywhere in the home.

In her series of screen prints Phytology, Tal Brosh illustrates the history of the Bethnal Green Nature Reserve. These prints explore the reserve’s life from a medieval meadow and market garden, through to a Victorian church, a war-time bomb site and now an apothecary garden. Phytology 2000 looks at the nature reserve’s now apothecary incarnation – where aromatic and medicinal plants grow. Bring a breath of fresh healing air into your home.

If you’re feeling adventurous why not conjure up your own scented candles? These little DIY, Make Your Own Candle Kits are an enjoyable way to spend a relaxing few hours. Each kit makes two small votive candles that will burn for roughly 15hrs each.

Contains soy wax flakes, fragrance oil, glass jars and wicks. The simple instruction leaflet explains exactly how to make your candles with ease. A thoughtful gift for any creative candle-loving person.

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OC&K Curates – Spring Time

Fresh green leaves and spring bulbs are starting to appear around us. The days are lengthening and blue skies shine above. Spring is such a lovely time of year and what with Mother’s Day coming up on Sunday 22 March there are plenty of reasons to bring a spring feel into your home, or give a gift with some springtime inspiration.

Spring is the time of year colour returns to our life. Slowly at first with gentle pastel tones, until the riot of hot summer takes over. It’s fresh and has a hint of warmth that banishes the memory of cold frosty mornings. Flowers begin to poke their heads out of the earth and there is an energy in nature. Freya Cumming’s work speaks of spring; her eye for gentle colour complimenting the season. This screen print titled Village Politics with its ‘best in bloom’ is finished with gold and silver leaf and is a great way of adding a bit of bright country style to any room.

Village Politics by Freya Cumming – £250

Polka dots still seem to be a firm fashion favourite and could be seen in the spring collections of some of the most well know fashion designers like Dries Van Noten’s collaboration with Christian Lacroix and Carolina Herrera. Your favourite spotty outfit needs a spotty accessory. These Form Circle Earrings from Tom Pigeon in Blush add a cool edition of colour to your outfit. A combination of Formica and brass they are perfect for any time of day or night.

Form Circle Earrings in Blush by Tom Pigeon – £30

You can’t have spring without fresh leaves appearing on the trees. This clock features a hanging willow branch pattern, evoking the dappled shade of sitting under a tree. Made from laser-cut, powder-coated steel, it features a quiet quartz mechanism and stamped aluminium hands. A minimal yet stylish way to celebrate nature.

Grass Green Willow Clock by Max Cairns – £100

Speaking of leaves, these leaf bookmarks by Another Studio just had to be included. They make the perfect little gift for a plant lover and feature the leaves of Maranta Leuconeuraia, Peperomia Argyreia, Caladium Bicolour and the Begonia Maculata. Celebrate the season of growth.

Leaf Bookmark Set – Steel by Another Studio – £9.50

It’s the time of year we start thinking about our gardens, (or any little space we may have set aside for growing things). If you are conscious of all the plastic used in the garden then this is the perfect way to go. Giving you the ability to produce recyclable and biodegradable newspaper pots for starting seedlings. These pots can be planted straight into the ground minimising damage to the roots of young plants. To read more about how they are made check out our ‘How to make Paper Pots using the Paper Pot Press’ Blog Post.

Paper Pot Press by Creamore Mill – £12.50

Spring colours are alive in this fun combination of Collage Studs from Wolf & Moon. This set of four mix and match earrings combine brass, painted wood, acrylic and mother of pearl. A versatile set in shades of green offset with some sparkle that will add spring vibes to any outfit.

Collage Studs by Wolf & Moon – £38

I had to end with this fun screen print by Tiff Howick of a yellow duck. Tiff Howick captures its fluffy feathery body with an expressive use of marks. Bold and bright in strong yellow colours, this is the perfect print to waddle into your home. A little duckling is an iconic image of spring and makes you think of new life.

Yellow Duck by Tiff Howick – £40

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OC&K Curates – Love

Love is in the air and with Valentine’s Day just around the corner we are using this edition of ‘OC&K Curates’ to bring you some of our most romantic gift ideas. Don’t forget to be prepared for February 14th, the perfect gift could be right here. Like a print reminding you of happy times, a book to inspire new adventures or a workshop to create new memories.

It was believed that the heart was the the centre of our strongest emotions, including love. The heart became the symbol of love and we see it everywhere the closer we get to Valentines Day. ♥️ That classic heart symbol is a bit overused don’t you think? Get back to the science of it with this Human Heart print by John Devolle. A characterful giclée with the feel of vintage text book illustrations.

Human Heart print by John Devolle – £60

 

Show someone they mean the world to you with one of Roderick Vere’s Planetary Collection rings. This collection takes its inspiration from our solar system. Like this Earth Ring which is crafted by hand in solid sterling silver and finished with a satin sheen. A beautiful and stunning, fully-hallmarked piece of jewellery.

Earth Ring by Roderick Vere – £95

Did you know that Roderick Vere also hosts silver ring making workshops here at Of Cabbages and Kings? A perfect romantic gift, and one that doesn’t only result in you ending the day with your own silver ring, but also the memory of the creating it.

Workshops at Of Cabbages and Kings 

 

Where did you go on your first date? If it was in East London there is a chance that Marc Gooderham may have painted or drawn it. With great attention to detail Marc has a talent for capturing the life of a place and his prints are an evocative reminder of London’s gems. We have a variety of his prints of some of East London’s most iconic establishments, like this one of Wiltons Music Hall. A place that also won Best Historic Wedding Venue 2019 at the UK Wedding Awards. Check out his others here.

The Music Maker by Marc Gooderham – £165

 

Nothing beats a cosy evening in with a loved one. Set the mood with a scented candle. The Oakwood + Tobacco Soy Wax Candle from Hobo + Co is warming blend of smoky oakwood and musky tobacco, a great scent for creating a relaxed atmosphere. Plus soy wax is a much healthier alternative to paraffin wax, it burns cleaner and holds the fragrance better.

Oakwood + Tobacco soy wax candle from Hobo + Co – £22

 

Maybe you’re looking for a gift that might spark a next adventure. Like some of the couples in this book: London Underground 1970-1980 by Mike Goldwater. Mike takes an intimate view of London’s iconic travel network. Documenting the loves, friendships and the day to day lives of the people that use it.

London Underground 1970-1980 by Mike Goldwater from Hoxton Mini Press – £16.95

 

Does a joint hobby connect you with your loved one? Coupling (A Good Book) – Edition A is from Tom Berry’s Daily Rites series. What’s more romantic than reading to each other? This bold yellow and blue pair sit embraced and entranced by their novels, a great reminder of a passion you share with someone close.

Coupling (A Good Book) – Edition A by Tom Berry – £75

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Cyanotypes – Becoming Invisible by Liz Loveless

A cyanotype print of a coat. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

Ahead of our upcoming exhibition with Liz Loveless of Factory Press we take a look at cyanotypes. In this show Liz presents us with a selection of artwork involving the cyanotype process. But what is a cyanotype and how are they created?

Dandelion and Grass cyanotypes by Liz Loveless

A cyanotype is a photographic process involving chemicals on paper or fabric that produces cyan blue prints. It was discovered by Sir John Herschel in 1842 as a way of reproducing drawings and diagrams such as architectural blueprints. Cyanotypes are a type of contact print which means the actual image being reproduced is placed directly over the paper. This opens it up to a whole host of creative possibilities, not just reproducing drawings, but using 3D objects. Liz uses this to great effect in her cyanotype works. Everyday objects such as bikes, coats, bottles and vegetation are used to create prints with a unique one-off quality.

A bike being exposed under a UV light onto treated paper. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

To create a cyanotype a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium are combined to create a photosensitive solution that is then applied to paper. This is allowed to dry in the dark to avoid exposure until it is ready to use. To create a print you must expose this coated paper to UV light, for example sunlight. This then creates a chemical reaction in the parts that are exposed to the light then darkening them. When fully exposed the chemical coated paper is then rinsed under running water. This washes away the unexposed chemical that was in shadow leaving a blank space, surrounded by the blue that was exposed to the light.

A large palm leaf  being exposed in sunlight. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

The most simple way of creating a cyanotype print is to lay objects on to your coated paper and then expose to sunlight. You can experiment with any objects. The more solid an object and the closer it is to the paper the more crisp a result you will get. Further away or less solid an object you will begin to get fuzzier edges. This is most apparent when using natural materials like leaves and flowers. Their 3D quality creates an unpredictable silhouette that fades from crisp dark blue to pale blue blurs. After the cyanotype has had an appropriate time in the sun (this can vary depending on the strength of the sunlight) it is then rinsed under running water and left to dry.

Finished print being rinsed. Image: Liz Loveless – Factory Press

Liz Loveless will be exhibiting more of her cyanotype prints at Of Cabbages and Kings in the show ‘Becoming Invisible‘, which runs from 6 February to 31 March 2020.

You can also book a spot on our Cyanotype Workshop – 2-4pm Saturday 14th March 2020.

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OC&K Curates – Gold Circles

On a grey January day with heavy clouds and the ever-present threat of rain in the air, we can start to long for sunnier times. In a series of blog posts titled ‘OC&K Curates’, Of Cabbages and Kings takes you on a themed tour of some of our favourite products. We have wandered the shelves and explored the print racks to put together this curated selection to chase away those dull days. The first of these posts looks at Gold Circles, pleasing circular shapes that remind us of a glint of gold and the warmth of the sun.

The straw colour of these Orla 11 Earrings takes the colour theme of gold, but with a softer more muted tone like hay bales in the evening sun. These classic link earrings are handmade by Wolf & Moon in their London studio. Made from painted wood they are lightweight enough to be worn all day. With the right amount of movement they are elegant and the colour is perfect to brighten up a dreary day or to complete a spring outfit.

Orla II Earrings in Straw by Wolf & Moon – £45.00

Taking inspiration from glamorous 80s beach parties, the gold circle in Sol Dawn by Tom Pigeon lends itself to an artistic interpretation of the rising sun. The shimmering gold foil print dramatically shines out from a pale background, like the sun emerging over the horizon on a misty morning. A minimal yet atmospheric addition to your home.

Sol Dawn by Tom Pigeon – £35

Two gold plated rings shine here and join together with cleverly design details in this Gold Rings Necklace by Brass & Bold. Hanging at either end of a chain they are secured as the chain passes through one of the hoops. A stylish piece perfect for day and evening wear. Each piece of Brass & Bold jewellery is handmade and designed by Elsa Gomez in London with an emphasis on exploring the simplicity and honesty of materials.

Gold Rings Necklace by Brass & Bold – £22

Ectopia is a print by the Brixton collective Underway Studio. Caitlin Parks and Melissa North both of Underway collaborated on this print which formed part of an art installation. Circles radiate around different animals and plants referencing the interconnection of all life.

The original project consisted of a multi-sensory installation exploring the appeal of Utopian thinking. It envisages a sustainable and better future for our planet and Society. The installation was featured in The London Design Festival 2016 and went on to showcase in the Porto and Belgium Design Biennale.

The illustration takes inspiration from a quote by Jason Hickel, ‘If we are to chart our way into a sustainable future, we will need to abandon our ontology of individualism and relearn this ontology of connection. We will need to rediscover the basic truth that our existence as individuals is bound up with the existence of others, and that our fate as a species is bound up with that of the fish, the forests, the bees, and the oceans.’

To read our interview with Underway Studio see the OC&K blog post.

Ectopia by Underway Studio – £60

These Form Circle Earrings in Yellow by Tom Pigeon mirror brass and coloured Formica. Inspired by mid-century modernist art and handcrafted using layers of yellow Formica and solid brass, this simple asymmetrical pair celebrate the circle. Tom Pigeon work closely with a family-run etching workshop on the West coast of Scotland to produce the bespoke metal pieces for their jewellery, which Tom Pigeon then polishes and assembles by hand in their studio.

Form Circle Earrings in Yellow by Tom Pigeon – £30

Circles are dominant in this Reykjavík 2 print by Jo Angell. The Reykjavík series are a collection of prints inspired by the artist’s trip to Iceland and in particular its harbours and the sea. This print reflects abstracted shapes reminiscent of life buoys or port holes on a ship, set against a warm palette of sand and gold. The original images were made using bold brush strokes and pen and ink drawings mixed with rough textures in contrasting dark and light colours.

To read more about Jo Angell see our interview with her on the OC&K blog post.

Reykjavík 2 by Jo Angell – £90

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How to Screen Print with Stencils

A recent addition at Of Cabbages & Kings are these handy screen printing kits. They come come in two sizes, the A4 Screen Printing Kit and the A3 Screen Printing Kit, and are perfect for printing at home with stencils. The kits contain a wooden screen (43T mesh count), a wooden square 75 shore blade squeegee and 100ml of black and 100ml of white water-based ink. Ideal for printing on tote bag’s and t-shirts, or creating your own prints and stationery on paper and card.

We’ve put together a handy step-by-step guide to get you started creating your very own screen prints.

You will need:

• A simple image to trace

• Freezer paper or grease proof paper

• A sharp scalpel

• A cutting mat

• Something to print on – paper, card, a t-shirt or tote bag

• An iron if printing onto fabric

Start by choosing a design. Bold graphic shapes work best and remember you will end up with a monochrome image so greyscale tones will not work. Something that is straight forward to cut with a scalpel also makes creating the stencil much simpler. You can draw out a design first or choose an existing design to trace. Shading in the parts you want to cut out makes it easier to visualise the finished design.

You can create your stencil from freezer paper paper or grease proof paper. Freezer paper will give you more detail and a finer edge and is available online and in some craft shops.

We are using a light box to make the tracing process clearer, but it is not essential. If your image has a high contrast you should be able to see it through the paper quite easily. It is also possible to draw your design directly onto the paper. If you are using freezer paper make sure you have the mat side up and the shiny side down.

Once your design is drawn out begin to carefully cut out the parts you want the ink to pass through. Take time over this process as neat and rough edges will reflect in the finished print. Top tip – If you over-cut you can patch up an area with tape on the reverse and re-cut. 

Once all the pieces are cut out and you are happy with the design you are ready to print. Choose a sturdy flat surface and lay down the fabric or paper on which you intend to print. If you are printing onto fabric make sure that it is ironed flat. You may also want to place a piece of card between layers of fabric, for example a t-shirt or tote bag, as this will prevent ink bleeding through. 

Place your stencil onto the paper or card making sure it is flat and that there are no creases or wrinkles. If you are using freezer paper the shiny side should face down.

Now place your empty screen over your stencil mesh down, making sure not move the stencil out of place.

Apply a generous amount of ink (as some will be absorbed by the paper on your first pull) along the top edge of your screen. 

With the help of a friend or using a firm hand, hold the screen in place so it wont slip and slide around. In the other hand hold the squeegee at a 20 degree angle from the vertical position. Apply even, but firm pressure and pull the squeegee across the screen in a downward motion. Repeat again ensuring the ink covers the whole of the design. 

Lift your screen gently off. Your stencil should now stick to the screen ready for the next print. 

Stand back and marvel at what you have created!

If you are printing onto fabric and wish to cure the ink, after it has air dried place a tea towel over it and iron for 3-5 minutes with a hot iron.

Happy Screen Printing!

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The Make Bank: Tackling Creative Poverty

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We are very excited to tell you about a new social project aimed at addressing some of the issues surrounding ‘creative poverty’ and young people’s access to art and design subjects and careers. The Make Bank has been set up by Kirsty Thomas, a former art and design teacher, and founder of creative studio Tom Pigeon. Kirsty’s research revealed that in recent years there has been a significant increase in the number of secondary pupils dropping out of creative subjects. She discovered that while some pupils were being advised that the creative industries did not offer a viable career path and that perhaps they should get a ‘proper job’, on other occasions it was because they simply didn’t have, or couldn’t afford the tools they needed to complete the course. This is where The Make Bank comes in.

Kirsty+Thomas_headshot4
The Make Bank Founder Kirsty Thomas

By providing Art and Design Kits for disadvantaged pupils, The Make Bank can help students who want to pursue creative education. Working with schools across the country The Make Bank has created quality art and design kits devised to meet the needs of all young people aged over 13 following the National Curriculum in Scotland, England, Ireland and Wales. For pupils studying GCSE, A Level, National 5, Higher and Advanced Higher qualifications they have created five subject-specific kits, so whether it’s art, design, photography, textiles or ceramics the students have the right tools for the job! Any pupil can apply for a Make Bank Kit in partnership with their teacher and it will be sent directly to their school.

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Alongside the kits the project also works with industry professionals to share inspiring stories, creative journeys and career advice, nurturing, inspiring and encouraging creative talent in young people and helping them recognise the wealth of opportunity that exists within the creative industries. To raise money for the kits Kirsty has teamed up with some of UK’s most exciting artists, illustrators and designers on the Make Bank Print Project, some of who we know very well here at Of Cabbages and Kings. You can find these ones, The Language of Colour by Stuart Gardiner (below), in our shop too. However, if prints aren’t you’re thing and you would like to donate directly just follow this link

 

We love this project, however materials alone will not create a new and diverse generation of creatives. Young people need guidance, support, inspiration and knowledge to enable them to pursue a creative career. The Make Bank is calling on everyone within the creative industries and beyond to stand up and do something about Creative Poverty. This is our opportunity to create a thriving industry that is equal, diverse and fair.

Would you like to get involved?  Visit the The Make Bank

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An Interview with Jo Angell

Jo Angell is preparing for her upcoming show: ‘Awash’ here at Of Cabbages & Kings. Featuring new works from a recent series of prints and paintings; abstract pieces, reflecting the interplay of land meeting water. The inspiration has come from landscapes as diverse as the harbours of Iceland to a riverside Essex village. Her images break the world down into bold graphic shapes, and the melding of texture and colour often reflects the interaction between industrial materials and nature.We’ve asked her a few questions and she talks us through her inspiration and processes.

What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, digital….
All of them in combination! It really depends what I’m working on. With my digital prints I often create shapes, textures and line elements with paintbrush and pens using black ink. I then scan these into my computer and start to work in a digitally creative way, to add colour and layering. With my paintings I use acrylic paint on canvas or plywood. I’m experimenting a lot with paint at the moment, with different brush sizes, substrates and acrylic mediums.


How long have you been printing and painting for?
Following a long career as a graphic designer, I did an MA in Textile Futures at Central St Martins in 2006-2008. It was during this course that I got back into screen printing (actually for wallpaper designs) and become involved with the digital revolution for print on textiles. This progressed into creating all sorts of surface pattern products. One of these was a collection of greetings cards which Tate Modern bought for their shop. I started to think of these as graphic prints as they were popular. This got me hooked into making archival quality digital prints. I also won the opportunity to create some work in a new gallery and further experimented with a set of prints for this. I’ve always painted, but in the past few years I have more felt the desire to experiment with paint and create one off pieces. Acrylic paint has suited me as I love how quickly it dries, and how rapidly I can create layers and textures.

How do you start building up an image?
With some of my paintings I have become interested in a less structured process. This might involve sketching on the canvas and painting a first rough layer. Then I like to allow myself to be more free and respond with the colours and space in any way which takes my mood at that moment. I find this interesting as sometimes this fails, and sometimes something unexpected and fresh emerges.

Where does your inspiration come from?
Travelling and finding new places always inspires me. I take a lot of photos and having just looked at them, there’s a strong theme that I’m always drawn to remnants of bygone eras or worn remnants of industrial bits and pieces. The textures on worn metals, woods and rope. In the past few years, I have been lucky enough to spend time painting in an Essex riverside village called Wivenhoe where boat shapes, rusted chains, buoys and worn wood gives me inspiration aplenty! I’m really inspired by the post war artists who went to St Ives in Cornwall such as Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth, Patrick Heron, Peter Lanyon who sought to create abstract work about the feelings of immersion in a place rather than be representational, using different materials.

Do you find having a background in Graphic Design influences your work?
To me, design and my art are linked. It’s all about balance of form, space and colour. I heard a quote from the artist Ben Nicholson recently which really resonated ‘Abstraction should be a vision of order like good design.’

Your work has a very distinctive set off repeating forms. Do you find yourself drawn to certain shapes and colours to explore a theme?
Definitely! I think most people doodle the same thing when they doodle. Mine tend to feature curves, reflections and rotations of these shapes which could be related to my textile design and pattern making background.

What’s your favourite takeaway?
Is this a foodie question?!
If it is, I love Thai vegetarian curry from Tootoomoo!

To see more of Jo’s work check out Jo Angell’s page on the OC&K site.

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An Interview with Underway Studio

Ahead of their upcoming show: Printed Spaces: East London Edition at Of Cabbages and Kings (12 April – 5 June 2019 and kicking off with a Private View – 7pm – 9pm, 11 April 2019) we have asked them a few questions.

Underway Studio is a collective of four artists based in Brixton, London. They work collaboratively on screen printed works, with a strong graphic feel that often has an architectural theme. With ‘Printed Spaces: East London Edition’ they explore the architecture of London’s cultural spaces, featuring new prints with an East London focus.

Underway’s, Melissa North, Caitlin Parks, Anna Schmidt and Aiden Barefoot.

There are currently four members of Underway Studio, how did you meet?
We all studied on the same Illustration and Visual Communication degree, but across several years. After graduation, we set up our own studio space to continue working in screen print and it has evolved from there. Initially the studio was a space to pursue our individual practices, but we started to collaborate on a few prints and soon developed a strong collective voice. After having a few different homes across London, we are now based in Brixton where we produce our own work and teach workshops.

 

How do you work on an idea collectively?
For the past 6 months our work has predominately been focused on the architecture of London’s cultural spaces. We wanted to start this portfolio as both a celebration of the rich culture we have in this city and to showcase the architecture of these spaces, much of which has been re-purposed and developed over the years. When we start developing prints we take a lot of photos and collage these together to see which subjects have the most interesting aesthetic, passing designs between one another until they are ready to be taken into screen print.
What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, digital, print?
Screen printing and collage. We love the way that you can play with scale and overlaying different colours and textures to create a completely unique result.

 

Tell us about the production side of things and how you produce work as a collective.
We physically share the files and material of what we are working on together. Print designs are passed between the collective until they are finalised and ready to screen printed. As a result, the artworks have an impression from each member creating a unique aesthetic. 

National Theatre by Underway Studio

Where do your influences come from for your subject matter?
Much of our work is influenced by architecture, form, texture and colour. Using a physical print process means that our visual language is both playful and distinctive, embracing any happy accidents along the way.
You have a very distinctive, bold use of colour. Is the colour influenced by the subject matter or come from somewhere else?
Colour lends itself extremely well to screen print.  Overlaying layers and textures creates interesting results that inspire and drive our work. We experiment in the studio doing test prints and playing with different colour combinations and this often leads us to our final palette.

 

What are your favourite takeaways?
We are all massive foodies and will eat anything from pizza to ramen. Honest Burger in Brixton is a particular favourite of ours, but you can’t beat South London staple Morleys to get us through the long printing hours!

 

To see more work by Underway Studio take a look at our website here. If you do get a chance come by the shop and check out the show.

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