Collaboration with Reverie Studio

As many of you know, the name of our shop is taken from the Walrus And The Carpenter in Lewis Carroll’s Through The Looking-Glass – And What Alice Found There.

When Reverie Studio approached us about doing a card collaboration we though that this could be an interesting idea to play with and what’s more we could tie the product launch in with our 10th Anniversary Party. We started thinking about what other children’s literary quotes there were and in particular, which would make great gift and birthday cards.

Having narrowed the list down to four quotes from two of our favourite children’s stories, Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan, Reverie Studio then kindly set about printing them up.

The cards are available in orange and pale grey and either singly or in packs of 8. As with all of Reverie Studio’s products they are recycled, recyclable and biodegradable. Some of the papers Reverie use are even recycled from coffee cups! Letterpress, one of the oldest forms of printing and still going strong today, is a method of relief printing. The text or image is etched onto a polymer plate, which is then inked and applied under pressure on a printing press to a piece of paper to transfer the ink. This often creates an embossed effect around the printed area and a truly handmade finish.

The cards are available now in the shop individually or in a pack of 8. The packs of 8 are also available online. Here are the quotes we chose. We hope you like them!

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

“You’re mad, bonkers and completely off your head. But I’ll tell you a secret….. all the best people are.”

“Where should I go? Alice. “That depends on where you want to end up” The Cheshire Cat

Peter Pan by J.M Barrie

“Would you like an adventure now, or shall we have tea first?”

“I suppose it’s like the ticking crocodile, isn’t it? Time is chasing after all of us.”

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Rachel Cox Studio Visit by George Cullen

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I visit ceramicist Rachel Cox in her studio in South West London and talk to her about her inspiration and process. She shows me the step by step methods used in creating her range of Tinto Ceramics. A surprising number of stages go into creating this collection and I’ve gained a new respect for these simple and elegant pieces and Rachel’s craft skills.

1.RACHEL-COX-Blog-01-ofcabbagesankings-oc&kRachel’s ceramics start with a coloured slip, which is a liquid clay mixture of porcelain, pigment and water.

What inspired you to become a ceramicist? 

As part of my BA degree in the Applied Arts I undertook the Erasmus exchange programme at the University of Pecs in Hungary, where I studied ceramics solely for six months. During this period I was given a lot of free time to really explore the material and its potentials, I was researching surface pattern and texture at the time and thoroughly enjoyed developing my ideas through the medium of clay. When I returned to my degree in the UK there was no going back, that was thirteen years ago now. Clay is such a malleable and changeable material it can portray almost infinite qualities. It is also an incredibly challenging material to use, which will not allow you to force your will upon it, you must rather understand its chemistry and behaviour in order to control it. For this reason it is a fascinating material to work with and requires a life long commitment in order to fully gain its command.  

1.RACHEL-COX-Blog-11-ofcabbagesankings-oc&kTo form the initial shape of the piece a plaster mould is used.

The mould can be separated into two pieces. The coloured slip is poured into the bottom part of mould and allowed to sit for a short time. The slip that is touching the plaster walls of the mould starts to dry and forms a skin on the inside. The excess slip is poured away, leaving a thin coating of coloured slip on the inside of the mould. Just like making a chocolate easter egg! The rough edges are then trimmed down and neatened off. 

Tell us a little about the process of creating your ceramic objects?

My designs always start as initial sketches on paper and later move into design software where they can be visualised three dimensionally. There are seven items in my collection, which I have developed over four years; I often design pieces together such as the carafe and cup set. When the designs are complete I make paper models in order to explore their scale and proportions physically. Most changes are made in the paper model stage as at this point I am interacting with the design and considering its functional and ergonomic qualities. This initial stage involves going back and forth between sketches on paper, computer designs and models. Later I will turn the final design out of plaster using chisels and specialised tools on a lathe, from this plaster 3D model I will make a two part plaster mould. The pastel colours are poured as liquid clay inside the plaster mould and are integral to the finished piece. Colour is also initially explored in my sketchbook through watercolour paints and is later developed in multiple series of ceramic colour tests, which involves mixing a spectrum of pigments in different percentages. The exterior surface of my pieces are very smooth and tactile, which involves multiple stages of sanding and finishing and are finally glazed on the inside with a shiny transparent glaze. 

The top part of the mould is then stacked and fastened with a band. This builds up the mould allowing the next layer of the plain porcelain slip to be added on top of the coloured one. As in the coloured slip process, the slip is poured in and allowed to sit for a time, it is then poured out of the mould. This leaves you with a complete, perfectly white porcelain layer, covering the coloured part on the inside. 

The pieces are then neatened up and any spilled slip is trimmed off leaving a neater edge.

Whats your favourite part of the process?

The favourite part of my process is right at the beginning during the initial conceptual design and colour development phase, this process can take months and is a creative and exciting period. 

1.RACHEL-COX-Blog-12-ofcabbagesankings-oc&kOnce out of the mould they are left to dry completely. Stacked on their rims to hold their shape. If handles are needed they are added once they are dry.

Handles are also made in a mould. They are applied to the mugs by first trimming the excess clay, then placing the handle against the mug and marking where it sits. These marks are then scratched to rough up the surface. Then like glue a mixture of water and slip is applied to the handle and mug. The handle is then pressed against the mug until it holds. 

The colour and form of your ceramics are very distinct, what were the inspirations for these?

The collection began while I was living in Barcelona and the shapes are influenced by the dining ware that I used on a daily basis such el vaso and la jarra on which I based the design of my contemporary cup and carafe set. The six complementary pastel shades of the collection emerged from colour surveys of my surrounding environment during that period and resulted in hundreds of ceramic colour tests being carried out to conclude the final six in the collection.

When the pieces are dry they can be hand finished. Out of the mould the rims and edges can be a little sharp and wouldn’t be pleasant to drink from. They are tidied up in a process called fettling. A wet sponge is used to work the rim into a more pleasing shape. This method of hand finishing ensures more control over the object. To make sure the piece is level it is rubbed rim side down, over a very even surface, covered in a damp cloth. Like sanding, this ensures the rim is level on all sides. A final finishing with a very fine sponge to make sure its even and to smooth out any join that might have appeared from the mould and any joins with the handle. 

How did the ‘Tinto’ collection get its name?

The name Tinto is a Spanish word, which originates from the Latin ‘tinctus’, meaning dyed, stained or tinted.

The next stage for the pieces are to be bisque fired. This is its first time in the kiln and its a process that hardens the clay so that it can be worked further. It also allows it to be glazed ready for its final firing. After they have been bisque fired they are all sanded down with different grades of sandpaper becoming finer and finer. This gives the pieces their characteristic finish and texture.  

Your mugs and cups sit very well in the hand. Does the way people interact with your pieces influence the design?

The design process heavily involves the functional considerations of the piece, such as how the piece feels to hold, its weight and material surface, how it sits in the hand and feels on the lips etc. The forms are designed with a consideration for balance and harmony, using glazed and unglazed ceramic surfaces I aim to produce items that are tactile and engage the user.

1.RACHEL-COX-Blog-22-ofcabbagesankings-oc&kThe final stage is to add a transparent glaze to the inside. Then they have their final firing in the kiln and the finished result is revealed. This picture shows you a mug before the fettling stage on the left and one finished from the kiln on the right . As the moisture is driving out through the firings the piece shrinks to give you the final sized object.  

Your mugs are great for the perfect cuppa! Whats your favourite brew? 

It has to be a strong Earl Grey with a dash of milk.

 

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Georgia Bosson Studio Visit by George Cullen

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Georgia Bosson, a screen printer and textile artist based in South London shows me around her studio and talks about her inspiration and practice.  Her screen printed trays and patterned notebooks, as well as collaborative prints with Cecily Vessey are now available in Of Cabbages and Kings.

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Ideas and experiments are pinned up behind her desk.

How long has the Georgia Bosson Studio been running?

I started the studio in 2013 after being offered a place to trade at Crafty Fox Market with my first batch of products, mostly cushions and a rainbow of hand screen printed tea towels. Since then I have taken on a huge variety of projects from developing my own line of products, to designing an outdoor canopy for a gallery and everything else in between! I am currently working on some new ideas after a trip to Mexico last October and I have just a launched a website for Makers House, a show that I curate and which I have big plans for in the coming months!

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Georgia’s process starts with sketchbook drawings that are then converted into vector graphics and applied to film.

How did you become interested in pattern and screen printing?

I first screen printed whilst studying for my A-levels and always returned to it as a means of laying down colour and texture over a large surface before adding more intricate details during my Embroidery degree. I love the immediacy of the process and I really enjoy that there is a certain level of restriction within the design process especially when I am working through ideas with paper stencils.

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A stencil is applied to the screen and then the ink is pushed though.

You seem to be keen on the hands on process of making, how does that affect your practice?

More often than not I design through making, I’ll usually have a series of drawings in my sketchbook that I then convert into hand cut paper stencils to be screen printed. I then continue to develop these ideas often bouncing around between a variety of imagery and generating lots of samples before settling on a few key ideas that are really working. This allows me to be less constrained and enables happy accidents such as inadvertently overlapped colours to occur, which often end up in final designs! My screen printed work always feels like it has more energy than the digital work and I love the idea that almost everything I make is unique in some way.

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A screen printed tray base.

We have recently started stocking your trays and notebooks, where did the inspiration come from for the design and patterns on those?

The notebooks were inspired by the remnants from industrially die cut felt that I have been working with since starting my business. It is a weird and wonderful material that is the waste product from when felt washers are cut out, the aim was to capture the shapes created when the patterns are overlaid. All of the books were riso printed and bound in London and are a limited edition of fifty. The tray pattern designs came from a series of drawings exploring the textures and patterns on a typical British beach, and the trays themselves were inspired by the sea defences in the sea side town where I have spent every summer since I was one!

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Georgia mixes her own colours at the studio and applies them to fabric. This way she can adjust and tweak the shades for her desired look.

You have an interesting colour palette that runs through your work, are there certain colours you are drawn to?

I love colour in any form, one of the best bits about screen printing is taking the time to mix colours, I have hundreds of scraps of fabric that are covered in colour swatches from past projects – they are one of the best archives of my process and I can never bear to throw them away. At the moment I am working on a new colour pallet based on a trip to Mexico, so currently there are lots of pinks and oranges on the print table spiked with soft teals and greens.

I am always drawn to an acid/mustard yellow and you can’t go wrong with a beautiful slate grey. When settling on the colours for a design I always think about the use of the final object and where it sits in the home, I felt I was able to be much bolder with my trays as they won’t necessarily be on display at all times and will usually have something on them!

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Greenwich- From The Wolfe Statue by Georgia Bosson and Cecily Vessey

We also stock your collaborative prints the ‘Landmark Locations’ series, a collaboration with Cecily Vessey. How did the idea for these come about?

Cecily was my mentor for my first market and since meeting we have worked on various pop up events and projects together including a live collaborative mural of the View from Peckham, which was done over a weekend at Crafty Fox Market. After the success of the Peckham mural and print we decided to look at expanding our collaboration and ended up working on twelve prints that we funded on Kickstarter. Whilst there are no plans for any more collaborative prints we are currently working towards a 100 mile bike ride together so I am sure some fresh ideas will crop up during the many training hours!

Your trays will be perfect for for serving drinks at summer parties! Whats your favourite cocktail?

In the summer an Aperol Spritz – very specifically served in a big glass preferably somewhere hot and sunny. And in the winter you can’t beat an Old Fashioned!

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Milk Tooth Statement Earrings at OC&K

It is no secret that we are pretty much all earring lovers here at Of Cabbages & Kings. Simple studs are great and everything, but to be honest we have a hard time turning down big, bold, statement earrings! We’ve just unpacked our first delivery of a new brand specialising in just that, and they do not disappoint.

Milk Tooth LDN is a fashion house dedicated to exceptional earrings and specialising in standout vintage pieces. Their first original range, The Pluralist Collection certainly creates impact.

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Inspired by striking cultural moments the designs combine a passion for gold and power dressing with contemporary patterns and bold shapes evocative of post-modern architecture. The result is a brilliantly fresh range of earrings that are both wearable, and of course, statement.

The brand’s philosophy is simple – embrace your style, wear things you love, feel amazing. Their belief is that bold fashion choices celebrate strong women and champion confidence. And with a statement earring, you have a hugely versatile and wearable option for creating a signature style.

The Pluralist Collection is a limited edition new range of gold-plated jewellery that offers distinction alongside great value. We have started our range with 4 styles, we can’t wait to see what they come up with next.

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MESH Studio with Marcelina Amelia

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On July 6th 2017 we will be hosting the official launch of MESH Studio with Marcelina Amelia here at Of Cabbages and Kings in Stoke Newington. On the opening night there will be a special pop-up shop from 5:30-9pm and the exhibition will run from July 7th until the end of August. We spoke with Marcelina to find out a bit more about MESH and the idea behind the brand.

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MESH is a multidisciplinary art brand and design studio founded by artist Marcelina Amelia: Meshing shit up!

Marcelina has taken her artwork beyond the confines of the canvass and has applied it to affordable art objects and wearable art as well as limited edition prints, books and other artworks in a range of different media. Rather than focusing on product design, Marcelina often combines her image making with found household objects to create a series of one-offs within a theme.MESH_STUDIO_GICLEEPRINTS_POSTER_MARCELINAAMELIA.jpgThe Mission Statement:

“Our aim is to embody the term ‘Renaissance girl’, and as the name suggests, we love mixing different techniques and forms, like screen-printing, fashion, painting, ceramics, publications, illustration, politics and activism, because art shouldn’t have any boundaries. We hope that this fluid and meshy structure of the brand, will allow us to collaborate more and make a lot of exciting work and happenings.

MESH’s first collection is titled The Unsatisfied Girls Club and is inspired by the recent movement of strong and powerful women who aren’t afraid to walk tall and proud, manifesting their thoughts, fighting for their rights at the Women’s Marches and other activist happenings all around the world. 

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The Unsatisfied Girls Club is a movement of women wanting and deserving more. Women uplifting each other, and rolling their eyes at the old outdated, stereotypical ways, not being ashamed of their ‘girliness’, standing for themselves and each other, because being a women isn’t a weakness. Research shows that many women are conforming to outdated stereotypes and acting ‘like an alpha male’ to succeed at work – including dressing like a man and hiding ‘girlie’ emotions.”

You can also read our interview with Marcelina on the blog from a few years ago when she had her last exhibition us.

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Adam Bartlett – Painting and Process

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We are excited to announce our next exhibition with Adam Bartlett aka Tigers of the Universe. You may have seen his prints in the shop over the few months, and we’ll be looking forward to see what comes next! Adam will be exhibiting some original paintings alongside limited edition giclée prints. The show opens with a private view on Thursday April 13th from 6:30pm, we hope you can join us.

Adam creates his paintings by building up many layers of painted patterns to create beautiful decorative artworks.  We were able to grab Adam for a few questions to ask about his work and process.

What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, digital….
My weapon of choice is the trusty pencil, followed closely by the brush.

How long have you been painting for? When did you start out?.
It feels like I have always been drawing and painting, although previously I was a digital illustrator for 8 years. It’s only been the in last 3 years that I’ve started painting again.

You often use a combination of media in your paintings, such as acrylic, spray paint, emulsion and even enamel. How do these combinations influence your final pieces?
The various mediums are used in layers. Emulsion is the base and finally the enamel for fine details. It’s not a hard and fast process, but more something that i enjoy. Also the paints have their own strengths and combined have good contrast and character. I am often unsure of the paints influence regarding the final piece, but more often than not pleasantly surprised.

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Many of your pieces have jungle animals and lush landscapes. Are they inspired by travel or imaginary locations?
The animals and forests are pure fantasy. I long for a world covered in jungle and forests where the animals and birds can roam free. The natural world is so stunning and I want to capture this in my paintings.

You have also worked in fashion textiles and design, does this background influence your current work?
More and more I feel the influence of textiles creeping back into the paintings, not only with introducing texture again, but thinking about fabric designs etc. It’s exciting to come full circle and bring these various experiences together again, but with a fresh perspective.

Do find you that you come back to certain motifs, themes and colours over pieces?
Yes, I think its important to keep certain repetitive elements in your paintings. Sometimes I feel guilty about repeating things, as if I’m not pushing myself enough, in which case exploiting repetitiveness will suffice.

What is your favourite takeaway?
Mmm, fish n chips or shish kebab

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Christmas List: Natalie

Today’s shop wishlist comes from Natalie, one of our behind the scenes and weekday staff members. As before her list crosses between both the shops in our storefront, Knit With Attitude and Of Cabbages & Kings. Natalie works behind the scenes for both shops during the week, and teaches the knitting classes.

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A sweaters worth of Lettlopi in Charcoal, oatmeal, white and pink! I have been dreaming of a cozy traditional Icelandic sweater to keep me warm in the winter months and I think this combo would give it a modern twist. The body would be in charcoal and the accents in the other three colours.

Ibiba necklace from Chalk. I love this simple necklace that still makes a statement. I find a lot of bib style necklaces hard to wear, but this one is just the right size.

Have You Herd? calendar from Mister Peebles. The illustrations in this are so amazing, I would love to look at it every month! It would be hard to choose a favourite month. Better yet it would be easy enough to frame them up at the end of the year to continue to enjoy them.

The Mindfulness in Knitting by Rachel Matthews has been super popular in the shop and I would love the chance to crack it open and read about how good knitting is for me.

Lingnum Fold pencil pot would be a great way to keep my pencils tidy, and stop my knitting needles from rolling all over the table when I’m not using them.

Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Zephyr to knit a shawl. I love this colourway! It’s a cream base with little speckles of neons, making it a wonderful pop of colour on these dreary grey winter days.

British and Irish Isles Place Maps from JollySmith. I only moved to England a few years ago, so these maps would be useful and help my local geography, a win-win!

Christmas Wishlist: Jess

Things are starting to get a bit festive here at the shop! We asked all the staff to put together their wish list from the shop. You might not know if you haven’t visited our shop in person, but we are actually 2 shops in one storefront. The other shop is called Knit With Attitude, and sells ethically and environmentally friendly yarns and knitting supplies sourced from around the world. Our Christmas lists cross both shops, so extra reason to pop by and see if something catches your eye. Maybe it will inspire your own list, or help you find a gift for someone else.

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First up is Jess’s list. She is the owner of Of Cabbages & Kings. We can see a bit of a colour theme going on here! Click on the links to see the products in the respective online shops.

Chris Andrews – Green Woodpecker print Maybe it’s the festive green and red combo that’s so appealing or memories of nature books and rambles through the woods?

Curve Hoops  I must be going through a green phase. These deco style earrings with the gold insert look super glamorous for party season. Want!!!

Pom Pom Quarterly Great little books. So collectable, they look lovely on the shelf and there are always two or three patterns I want to have a crack at. This winter it’s the Palindrome and Ondeto scarfs.

Sacred Saffron Beyul from Kettle Yarn  There’s a lace top I have in mind for this yarn. I love the rich rusty tones and silky sheen.

Project bag by Smock Shop Practical gift – these are so handy. And since I’ve usually got several projects on the go, I could really do with a different bag for each one.

Studio Noah Pots I have a fireplace in my new flat that’s just crying out to be filled with plants. These would be great potted with some succulents. Also, they’re made with volcanic ash and that’s just cool.

Soakwash This wash is so great for more than washing just wool, it’s saved a few of my silk tops that got a spot on them as well!

Thanks Jess! You can find all the items listed here online and in the shop! What’s on your wishlist?

Ashley Amery Inverview and Exhibition

We are excited to announce the next exhibition in the shop. Ashley Amery will be displaying new prints and drawings on July 2 from 7-9pm. If you are interested in attending you can RSVP with our Facebook event.

We were able to grab Ashley for a little interview about her work and inspirations, as well as a preview of some of her pieces that will be displayed in the show.
Web Banner OCK show_2What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, printing squeegee…
A pigment liner pen, or a small paint brush.

You have studied art in California, Italy and in London. Did you find that there were different approaches to art in each place? Has that influenced your work?
I think place always influences work, the landscape as much as the people. In California, I studied under artists influenced by Abstract Expressionism, who focused on the act of painting as an expression of the unconscious. California felt big and open. Large canvases layered with paint made sense in the space there. When I moved to Italy, it was a different world, packed with detail, and an extensive past. I had access to darkrooms and printmaking studios, and a library full of art theory books. I became interested in photography and how an art piece can embody a concept. I wanted to live in London partly because I read about ideas coming from the art colleges there. I loved the work of artists who used their practice as a way of thinking philosophically, often humorously. During my MA at Camberwell I began to draw about my internal struggles to define my identity. Since then I have circled back to the unconscious, approaching it with illustrative imagery rather than painterly gestures. Using the narrative aesthetic of illustration can be an unsettling way to point toward questions about limitations. Opposition within a piece creates energy.Ashley Studio shot

Your pieces evoke storytelling, imagination and play, while also hinting at darker mysteries. Can you tell us a bit more about your inspiration for creating these pieces?
For me, art is play that helps me access my thoughts. I like to think of my drawings as a way of looking for the unknown self.

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Swimming by Ashley Amery 420×594 mm.

You also run a business (White Wall Yellow Door) creating children’s resources for museums and galleries. Do you find it very different to create art for children than adults?
The work I do with WWYD is about creating space for children to use their imaginations, which often means having to think about bigger ideas and take away much of my own detail work. I co-direct with an artist friend of mine, Sophy Rickett, and we enjoy the challenge of getting ideas about art across to young people. Each project has a direct aim and a client, providing a nice structure to work within. It’s exciting to make something kids spend time with, giving them ways to discover their own ideas and abilities.

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Story no. 1 by Ashley Amery. Gouache on paper.

Do you find yourself returning to themes with your work?
I am fascinated by the idea of the human mind, memory, and the unconscious, especially Jung’s archetypal Shadow. I have returned to this in a number of drawings and prints.
How long have you been printing?
I have been printmaking in some form since 2005, and I’ve always been drawing.

What is your favourite takeaway?
Bos Cirrik

Kingdom Under A Hat /// A Tour Of Factory Press

We’re very excited at Of Cabbages and Kings, to be hosting the launch of the latest edition from Factory Press Kingdom Under A Hat on Thursday 5th March, and last week I cycled over to Clapton to meet the creator – artist, designer and printmaker Liz Loveless. The book is the 9th published by Factory Press and I visited Liz at her studio and shop on the site of a disused ice cream factory just off Chatsworth Road to discuss the story behind it.

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A few years ago Liz had been asked to do some illustrations based upon the story of The Rock Garden of Chandigarh in India: A secret world built entirely from rubbish scavenged by it’s creator Nek Chand. This ‘Kingdom’ as Chand liked to refer to it, consisted of man-made interlinked waterfalls and other sculptures made of scrap and waste (bottles, glasses, bangles, tiles, ceramic pots, sinks, electrical waste, etc.) which were placed in walled paths.

The hidden garden had been built in a gorge Chand believed to be wasteland outside the city and no one found it for 19 years. It was discovered by the authorities in 1975, by which time, it had grown into a 12-acre complex of interlinked courtyards, each filled with hundreds of pottery-covered concrete sculptures of dancers, musicians, and animals. A battle then commenced to save the garden from demolition and it was finally granted public space status in 1976.

In January 2014 Liz had the opportunity to visit the garden herself and once again felt inspired by the story of Nek Chand and his secret rock garden. She started gathering discarded wrappers and other paper scraps from the pathways around the garden itself, which she bought back home to use and interweave into her own expression of the rock garden story. These collaged, enlarged sweet wrappers now decorate the end papers of her book.

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Liz often combines collage techniques with hand-pulled silkscreen to create the illusion of texture over a flat surface. Her books start life as A1 sheets of paper screen printed in 3 colours on both sides and finish as limited editions hand bound in cloth or card. Kingdom Under A Hat will be an edition of 650. These large sheets are then guillotined into double pages, arranged in order, folded with the bone folder, measured, hole punched and hand sewn to form the body of the book.

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As I watched Liz at each step in the book making process I began to truly understand the love and craftsmanship that goes into constructing each and every one. The next stage was the nipping press. I’d been eying up this beautiful object since I’d entered the studio and couldn’t wait to see Liz put it into action. Liz cases the books in grey card, glues the end papers and covers the spine with bright coral book cloth. The nipping press will only hold 4 books at a time. Cellophane is placed between the pages to prevent the ink from sticking and the books are left overnight, sealing the endpapers to the cover and pressing the pages completely flat. By morning the new books are ready to be numbered and added to the edition.

On Thursday 5th March we’ll be hosting a very special evening to launch the new book. Liz will be at the shop with so please join us on a journey to the magical rock garden of Chandigarh, see Liz’s photo collage installation including a life size bicycle and watch a short supporting animation as well as grab your copy of this beautiful limited edition, hand-pulled silk screen printed, hardback, hand-bound book. There’ll probably be drink or two going round too!

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