On The Other Side Of Town by Tom Berry

Tom Berry creates intricate drawings mainly with pen and ink. His original illustrations, which often feature animal and nature scenes with incredible depth and detail are then giclée printed in limited editions.

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Recently, Tom launched a Kickstarter to help publish his first illustrated book ‘On The Other Side Of Town‘. The campaign was so successful that it was fully funded in just over 24 hours, and he was able to do a print run of 1000 copies! The book is in a large format, with 24 pages and 15 detailed original illustrations and short poems. Together they tell the story of a busy town and the characters that make it. Each book in this first edition is numbered out of 1000 and signed by Tom.

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As a part of his Kickstarter campaign Tom filmed part of the process of illustrating the book as well as images from his early morning commutes through the city that provided his inspiration. He found that travelling at unusual times of the day revealed further layers of the city, in people and buildings than he would encounter during the day. These layers became the fantastical illustrations and poems found in the book.

We have ‘On The Other Side of Town’ and a number of Tom’s original digital prints in stock in the shop and online.

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Q&A with Tiff Howick

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We are excited to announce our next exhibition will be with Tiff Howick. It will run from Thursday February 4th, with an opening preview on Wednesday February 3rd from 6:30-9pm.

Tiff’s artwork features striking portraits of animals, focusing on dogs and British wildlife. They are done with a loose, expressive style in black ink, printed over a strong colour on crisp white paper.

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What is your artistic weapon of choice? Pencil, pen, paintbrush, printing squeegee…
It is very hard to choose, I would say overall it’s a paintbrush, I really enjoy experimenting with brushmarks to create different textures.  

Your art features striking portraits of animals. Have you always been drawn to animals?
I have, I grew up with pets – Jack Russells, rabbits and guinea pigs. I also spent my summer holidays in Norway where there were sheep grazing in the forests and we’d see squirrels, deer and elk.  

Your animals are very expressive, like they each have their own personality. Is that something that evolves as each animal is drawn?
Mostly the expression is intentional, I’ll have a reference image with an animal in a pose that I think represents a particular behaviour or emotion such as the spirited French Bulldog or the thoughtful Greyhound.  Sometimes the expressions evolve and either reflect the mood I’m in when I’m drawing or I make subtle changes to the eyes to create an overall feeling that works for the drawing. 

Reading the expressions in my screen prints is subjective, people commenting on my work have seen a variety of different emotions. 

Your art is inspired by your Scandinavian heritage, vintage children’s illustrations, and contemporary fashion illustration. On the surface these styles are quite different, what is it within them that you think draws them all together so successfully?
Over time I have incorporated in to my work the elements of each style that I most admire.  Limited colour palettes from Scandinavian design and the creation of striking images with just one or two colours.  The bold colours are from Scandinavia and my childhood picture books, two of my all-time favourite illustrators are Carl Larsson and Richard Scarry.  The loose, textured brush marks and sketchy lines are inspired by fashion illustration, I am a huge fan of David Downton’s work. 

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One of your most popular prints has been the Yellow Hare, which features a bright splash of yellow. Some of your prints feature colours that are not traditionally associated with the animal depicted. Do you feel that the colour can change the mood of the animal?
I’ve used bright primary colours to represent extreme versions of the animal’s natural colour, using one vibrant colour to simplify the final image. This sometimes ties in with the mood of the piece, the bright red fox staring assertively over it’s shoulder.  The hare is resting but alert, the bright yellow also representing a hot day in a cornfield.  

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How long have you been printing?
I first printed a long time ago on an art foundation course.  I rediscovered screenprinting fairly recently and have been using it to create most of my work for just over three years. Tiff-Howick-screenprinting-work-images

What is your favourite takeaway?
Since starting to work for myself I’ve researched and read a lot about how to make it work.  I would say the best advice, and the hardest for me to stick to, is to focus. Being creative my head is always full of new ideas, there are so many things I want to do and experiment with.  To make a living out of work that I really enjoy I’ve had to pick one idea and work really hard to make my screenprints as good as they can be. 

Or if you mean food it would have to be Indian :o) 

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Kid Spirit

Local artist Johnathan Reiner has produced a series of hand-pulled screen prints entitled ‘Kid Spirit’. His masked child figures confront the viewer, questioning relationships, childhood and the expansive and wild possibilities of the imagination.

Johnathan trained as a doctor in Neuroscience, but in recent years he has been devoting much of his time to learning the art of print making. In his screen prints he combines graphic and illustrative components with drawings and the manipulation of photographic textures and details to explore colour, pattern and composition.

 

Kid Spirit I - Maui
Kid Spirit I – Maui

Kid Spirit II - ChicksKid Spirit II – Chicks

Detail from Kid Spirit II - Zoro
Detail from Kid Spirit II – Zoro

Sugar Snap Studio

Sugar Snap Studio was set up in 2012, to house the growing collection of illustrations for children by Jessie Ford. To date, her work has included packaging for Mothercare, suitcase illustrations for Samsonite, children’s books for Abrams Publishing USA, and murals for Sophie Dahl, to name a few.

Last Summer, Sugar Snap Studio’s products were sold in Selfridges, as part of the Bright Young Things show, with the Poundshop Collective. She has exhibited widely, in New York, Milan, London, and this coming Winter, in Japan. Sugar Snap Studio’s graphic and colourful designs are due to hit the shops this Spring, when it’s first stationery line will be launched.
Jessie’s simple illustrations of creatures great and small depicted in bold colours are distinctive in style. Here are a few of our favourites:
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Bear Hunt by Sugar Snap Studio
A young boy consults his book as he wanders through the dark woods on a starry night followed by a procession of bears wearing party hats.
Fox by Sugar Snap Studio
Fox by Sugar Snap Studio
Mr Fox is looking very dapper in this striking orange and back print.
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Bear on a Bike by Sugar Snap Studio
This big smiley black bear peddles through the park on his penny farthing bicycle.